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EARLY CHURCH

Ambrose
Ambrose, Pseudo
Andreas
Arethas
Aphrahat
Athanasius
Augustine
Barnabus
BarSerapion
Baruch, Pseudo
Bede
Chrysostom
Chrysostom, Pseudo
Clement, Alexandria
Clement, Rome
Clement, Pseudo
Cyprian
Ephraem
Epiphanes
Eusebius
Gregory
Hegesippus
Hippolytus
Ignatius
Irenaeus
Isidore
James
Jerome
King Jesus
Apostle John
Lactantius
Luke
Mark
Justin Martyr
Mathetes
Matthew
Melito
Oecumenius
Origen
Apostle Paul
Apostle Peter
Maurus Rabanus
Remigius
"Solomon"
Severus
St. Symeon
Tertullian
Theophylact
Victorinus

HISTORICAL PRETERISM
(Minor Fulfillment of Matt. 24/25 or Revelation in Past)

Joseph Addison
Oswald T. Allis
Thomas Aquinas
Karl Auberlen
Augustine
Albert Barnes
Karl Barth
G.K. Beale
Beasley-Murray
John Bengel
Wilhelm Bousset
John A. Broadus

David Brown
"Haddington Brown"
F.F. Bruce

Augustin Calmut
John Calvin
B.H. Carroll
Johannes Cocceius
Vern Crisler
Thomas Dekker
Wilhelm De Wette
Philip Doddridge
Isaak Dorner
Dutch Annotators
Alfred Edersheim
Jonathan Edwards

E.B. Elliott
Heinrich Ewald
Patrick Fairbairn
Js. Farquharson
A.R. Fausset
Robert Fleming
Hermann Gebhardt
Geneva Bible
Charles Homer Giblin
John Gill
William Gilpin
W.B. Godbey
Ezra Gould
Hank Hanegraaff
Hengstenberg
Matthew Henry
G.A. Henty
George Holford
Johann von Hug
William Hurte
J, F, and Brown
B.W. Johnson
John Jortin
Benjamin Keach
K.F. Keil
Henry Kett
Richard Knatchbull
Johann Lange

Cornelius Lapide
Nathaniel Lardner
Jean Le Clerc
Peter Leithart
Jack P. Lewis
Abiel Livermore
John Locke
Martin Luther

James MacDonald
James MacKnight
Dave MacPherson
Keith Mathison
Philip Mauro
Thomas Manton
Heinrich Meyer
J.D. Michaelis
Johann Neander
Sir Isaac Newton
Thomas Newton
Stafford North
Dr. John Owen
 Blaise Pascal
William W. Patton
Arthur Pink

Thomas Pyle
Maurus Rabanus
St. Remigius

Anne Rice
Kim Riddlebarger
J.C. Robertson
Edward Robinson
Andrew Sandlin
Johann Schabalie
Philip Schaff
Thomas Scott
C.J. Seraiah
Daniel Smith
Dr. John Smith
C.H. Spurgeon

Rudolph E. Stier
A.H. Strong
St. Symeon
Theophylact
Friedrich Tholuck
George Townsend
James Ussher
Wm. Warburton
Benjamin Warfield

Noah Webster
John Wesley
B.F. Westcott
William Whiston
Herman Witsius
N.T. Wright

John Wycliffe
Richard Wynne
C.F.J. Zullig

MODERN PRETERISTS
(Major Fulfillment of Matt. 24/25 or Revelation in Past)

Firmin Abauzit
Jay Adams
Luis Alcazar
Greg Bahnsen
Beausobre, L'Enfant
Jacques Bousset
John L. Bray
David Brewster
Dr. John Brown
Thomas Brown
Newcombe Cappe
David Chilton
Adam Clarke

Henry Cowles
Ephraim Currier
R.W. Dale
Gary DeMar
P.S. Desprez
Johann Eichhorn
Heneage Elsley
F.W. Farrar
Samuel Frost
Kenneth Gentry
Steve Gregg
Hugo Grotius
Francis X. Gumerlock
Henry Hammond
Hampden-Cook
Friedrich Hartwig
Adolph Hausrath
Thomas Hayne
J.G. Herder
Timothy Kenrick
J. Marcellus Kik
Samuel Lee
Peter Leithart
John Lightfoot
Benjamin Marshall
F.D. Maurice
Marion Morris
Ovid Need, Jr
Wm. Newcombe
N.A. Nisbett
Gary North
Randall Otto
Zachary Pearce
Andrew Perriman
Beilby Porteus
Ernst Renan
Gregory Sharpe
Fr. Spadafora
R.C. Sproul
Moses Stuart
Milton S. Terry
Herbert Thorndike
C. Vanderwaal
Foy Wallace
Israel P. Warren
Chas Wellbeloved
J.J. Wetstein
Richard Weymouth
Daniel Whitby
George Wilkins
E.P. Woodward
 

FUTURISTS
(Virtually No Fulfillment of Matt. 24/25 & Revelation in 1st C. - Types Only ; Also Included are "Higher Critics" Not Associated With Any Particular Eschatology)

Henry Alford
G.C. Berkower
Alan Patrick Boyd
John Bradford
Wm. Burkitt
George Caird
Conybeare/ Howson
John Crossan
John N. Darby
C.H. Dodd
E.B. Elliott
G.S. Faber
Jerry Falwell
Charles G. Finney
J.P. Green Sr.
Murray Harris
Thomas Ice

Benjamin Jowett
John N.D. Kelly

Hal Lindsey
John MacArthur
William Miller
Robert Mounce

Eduard Reuss

J.A.T. Robinson
George Rosenmuller
D.S. Russell
George Sandison
C.I. Scofield
Dr. John Smith

Norman Snaith
"Televangelists"
Thomas Torrance
Jack/Rex VanImpe
John Walvoord

Quakers : George Fox | Margaret Fell (Fox) | Isaac Penington


PRETERIST UNIVERSALISM | MODERN PRETERISM | PRETERIST IDEALISM

Thomas Hayne
(1582-1645)

"But the famous Kindome of Christ and Christians began moe years then one thousand five hundred agon.. Therefore the notable binding of Satan began one thousand five hundred years agon, and therefore is past long before our time." (Christs Kingdome on Earth, p. 72)

Christs kingdome on earth, opened according to the Scriptures. Herein is examined, what Mr. Th. Brightman, Dr. J. Alstede, Mr. I. Mede, Mr. H. Archer, The glympse of Sions glory, and such as concurre in opinion with them, hold concerning the thousand years of the saints reign with Christ, and of Satans binding: herein also their arguments are answered. (Published 1645 by Printed by R. Cotes for S. Bowtell in London)


  • 10/1/12: Thomas Hayne (1645) Quoted in Heaven Upon Earth "But the famous Kindome of Christ and Christians began moe years then one thousand five hundred agon.. Therefore the notable binding of Satan began one thousand five hundred years agon, and therefore is past long before our time." (Christs Kindome on Earth, p. 72)

  • Jeffrey K. Jue: Heaven on Earth: Joseph Mede and the rise of millenarianism - Section 8 - Challenges from Preterists (2006) This book contributes to the ongoing revision of early modern British history by examining the apocalyptic tradition through the life and writings of Joseph Mede (1586-1638). The history of the British apocalyptic tradition has yet to undergo a thorough revision. Past studies followed a historiographical paradigm which associated millenarianism with a revolutionary agenda. A careful study of Joseph Mede, one of the key individuals responsible for the rebirth of millenarianism in England, suggests a different picture of seventeenth-century apocalypticism. The roots of Mede's apocalyptic thought are not found in extreme activism, but in the detailed study of the Apocalypse with the aid of ancient Christian and Jewish sources. Mede's legacy illustrates the geographical prevalence and long-term sustainability of his interpretations. This volume shows that the continual discussion of millenarian ideas reveals a vibrant tradition that cannot be reconstructed to fit within one simple historiographical narrative.

    "Hayne went so far as to argue that the coming of the Son of Man in the clouds in Daniel referred exclusively to Christ's first coming.  "Coming in the Clouds, dan. 7. is not the last Judgment at Doomsday but Christ's coming to take the Kingdom which he preached to be at hand, of all power being given to him." (Mede, Works, pp. 740,752)

    "The debate between Mede and Thomas Hayne illustrates an important division that emerged within the English apocalyptic tradition. The sixteenth century marked the increase of the historical-prophetic exegetical method, while the seventeenth century witnessed the dominance of this hermeneutic. Yet within this historicist tradition in England, two competing interpretations arose. The followers of Mede continued to endose his millenarianism, while others like Thomas Hayne argued for a preterist reading." (p. 150)

    ‎"The sixteenth century marked the increase of the historical-prophetic exegetical method, while the seventeenth century witnessed the dominance of this hermeneutic. Yet within this historicist tradition in England, two competing interpretations arose. The New England pastor, Increase Mather, expressed his opinion of ...the Dutch scholar Hugo Grotius and his most ardent English supporter Henry Hammond in one of his dissertations:

    • "As for Grotius, I look on my self as concerned to warn young Scholars to beware of him, lest they suck down Poison when they think they have found Honey.  He has by perverse Expositions and Interpretations in his Annotations on the Bible, corrupter many Texts of Scripture .. Dr. Hammond has borrowed most of his Nations from Grotius (especially his apocalyptical ones) whoever compares them will quickly discern."

    "All millenarians in the same strand as Mede shared Mather's scathing sentiments, because Grotius, Hammond and later the puritan pastor Richard Baxter provided the strongest and most sustained opposition against a millennarian eschatology." (Heaven and earth, p. 150 "Katherine Firth describes their interpretation as a "New Way," which solicited repeated responses from those who contained to follow Mede."


EARLY CRITICAL DEBATE BETWEEN A FUTURIST ESCHATOLOGY AND A MODERN PRETERIST ESCHATOLOGY : JOSEPH MEDE VS. THOMAS HAYNE

  • In the end neither Mede nor Hayne surrendered any exegetical ground.   Hayne regarded Mede as his "worthy and learned friend, but not to bee preferred before truth."

  • The debate between Mede and Thomas Hayne illustrates an important division that emerged within English apocalyptic tradition.


 

"But the famous Kingdome of Christ and Christians began moe years then one thousand five hundred agon.. Therefore the notable binding of Satan began one thousand five hundred years agon, and therefore is past long before our time." (Christs Kingdome on Earth, p. 72)

"If the Roman Empire, Apoc. 13, be resembled by a Beast which is composed of all Daniel's four Beasts, Dan. 7. Or the chief parts of the four Beasts, then it is but sufficiently expressed by them all."  (First letter to Mede dated 5 June 1629.  Mede, Works, p. 735)

"The Fourth beast, Dan. 7. and the first Beast, Revel. 13 are not one and the same: They differ much in shape of body, and in their acts, and in their falls and plagues.  Besides, that in the Apocal. is made as it were of all the four in Daniel, and is so described as if it came in stead, and was comparable to them all; as indeed it was." (Second letter to Mede, undated, ibid. 741)

 

WHAT OTHERS HAVE SAID

Jeffrey K. Jue
"Significantly Hayne placed the beginning of the millennium of Apocalypse 20 in the first century with Christ's first advent, the ministry of the Apostles and the destruction of Jerusalem."

"All that awaited fulfillment in Hayne's interpretation of the apocalyptic drama was the return of Christ to throw the Devil, the beast and the false prophet into the eternal lake of fire (20:10)." (Heaven on earth, p. 150)

"Hayne went so far as to argue that the coming of the Son of Man in the clouds in Daniel referred exclusively to Christ's first coming.  "Coming in the clouds, Dan.7, is not the last Judgment at Doomsday but Christ's coming to take the Kingdom which he preached to be at hand, of all power being given to him."


"Preterism still struggled to gain credibility within other Protestant countries, especially England. The English commentator Thomas Hayne claimed that the prophecies of Daniel had all been fulfilled by the 1st century (‘Christs Kingdom on Earth’, 1645), and Joseph Hall expressed the same conclusion concerning Daniel’s prophecies (‘The Revelation Unrevealed’, 1650), but neither of them applied their Preterist views to Revelation. However, the exposition of Grotius convinced the Englishman Henry Hammond. Hammond sympathized with Grotius’ desire for unity among Christians, and found his Preterist exposition useful to this end.[17] Hammond wrote his own Preterist exposition in 1653, borrowing extensively from Grotius. In his introduction to Revelation he claimed that others had independently arrived at similar conclusions as himself, though he gives pride of place to Grotius.[18] Hammond was Grotius’ only notable Protestant convert, and despite his reputation and influence, Grotius’ interpretation of Revelation was overwhelmingly rejected by Protestants and gained no ground for at least 100 years." (The Case for Biblical Universalism: Preterist Eschatology)

 

WIKIPEDIA BIOGRAPHY

Thomas Hayne (1582–1645) was an English schoolmaster and theologian.

Life

The son of Robert Hayne of Thrussington, Leicestershire, he matriculated from Lincoln College, Oxford, on 12 October 1599. He was admitted B.A. on 23 January 1605, was appointed second under-master of Merchant Taylors' School, London, in the same year, became usher at Christ's Hospital in 1608, and commenced M.A. in 1612.[1] He died on 27 July 1645, and was buried in Christ Church, London, where a monument, destroyed in the Great Fire of London, was erected to his memory. Anthony Wood describes him as a scholar particularly respected by John Selden.
 

Legacy

By will dated 20 September 1640 he bequeathed his books to the library at Leicester, with the exception of a few which he left to the library at Westminster. He also gave £400, to buy land or houses for the maintenance of a schoolmaster at Thrussington to teach ten poor children, and bequeathed £42 yearly for the maintenance of two scholars in Lincoln College, Oxford. Other charitable bequests are included in his will.

Other gifts during his lifetime were towards the library of Sion College[2][3]; and of Minuscule 69, a significant manuscript, to the Leicester library in 1640.[4]
 

His works are:

* 'Linguarum cognatio, seu de Linguis in genere et de Variorum Lingarum Harmoniii Dissertatio,' London. 1639. Reprinted in Thomas Crenius's 'Analecta Philologico-Critico-Historica,' Amsterdam, 1699.
* 'Grammaticae Latine Compendium,' London, 1640.
* 'The equal wayes of God: for rectifying the unequal wayes of man. Briefly and clearly drawn from the sacred Scriptures. . . . Second edition, revised and . . . enlarged,' London, 1640.
* 'The Life and Death of Dr. Martin Luther, presented in an English dresse, out of the learned and laborious work of Melchior Adam,' London, 1641.
* 'Of the Article of our Creed: Christ descended to Hades, or ad Inferos' (anon.), London, 1642.
* 'Christs Kingdome on Earth, opened according to the Scriptures. Herein is examined what Mr. Th. Brightman, Dr. J. Alstede, Mr. I. Mede, Mr. H. Archer, The Glympse of Sions Glory, and such as concurre in opinion with them, hold concerning the thousand years of the Saints Reign with Christ, and of Satans binding,' London, 1645.

Hayne also published a 'General view of the Holy Scriptures; or the Times, Places, and Persons of Holy Scripture,' 2nd edit., much enlarged, London, 1640. The first edition of this anonymous book was called 'Times, Places, & Persons of the holie Scriptures. Otherwise entituled, The General View of the Holy Scriptures' London, 1607.
[edit] Notes

1. ^ Thomas Hayne in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
2. ^ http://www.lambethpalacelibrary.org/files/2007_Annual_Review.pdf, p. 30.
3. ^ Ernest Harold Pearce, Sion College and Library (1913), p. 247.
4. ^ Bruce Manning Metzger, Manuscripts of the Greek Bible: an introduction to Greek palaeography (1981), p. 138.

 

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