Online Bible and Study Tools
Translate || Vine / Schaff || Alts/Vars/Criticism/Aramaic

 
 


End Times Chart


Introduction and Key

BOOKS:  BIBLICAL STUDIES (1500BC-AD70) / EARLY CHRISTIAN PRETERISM (AD50-1000) / FREE ONLINE BOOKS (AD1000-2008)


AD70 Dispensationalism: According to that view, AD70 was the end of 'this age' and the start of the 'age to come'.    Those who lived before AD70 could only 'see in part' and such, lacking the resurrection and redemptive blessings which supposedly came only when Herod's Temple in Jerusalem fell.    Accordingly, AD70 was not only the end of Old Testament Judaism, but it was also the end of the revelation of Christianity as seen in the New Testament.

HYPER PRETERISM

"Full preterist" material is being archived for balanced representation of all preterist views, but is classified under the theological term hyper (as in beyond the acceptable range of tolerable doctrines) at this website.  The classification of all full preterism as Hyper Preterism (HyP) is built upon well over a decade of intense research at PreteristArchive.com, and the convictions of the website curator (a former full preterist pastor).  The HyP theology of final resurrection and consummation in the fall of Jerusalem, with its dispensational line in AD70 (end of old age, start of new age), has never been known among authors through nearly 20 centuries of Christianity leading up to 1845, when the earliest known full preterist book was written.  Even though there may be many secondary points of agreement between Historical/Modern Preterism and Hyper Preterism, their premises are undeniably and fundamentally different.

WARNING: THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL HAS BEEN CLASSIFIED AS "HYPER PRETERIST"



Letter to WT Sherman
http://www.library.georgetown.edu/dept/speccoll/fl/sherman.jpg
"I am a lawyer, a theologian, and a politician"


"I believe that both Charles Guiteau and his father were crasey on religion." H.B. Amerling

STUDY ARCHIVE

Main Page

Click For Site Updates Page

Free Online Books Page

Historical Preterism Main

Modern Preterism Main

Hyper Preterism Main

Preterist Idealism Main

Critical Article Archive Main

Church History's Preteristic Presupposition

Study Archive Main

Dispensationalist dEmEnTiA  Main

Josephus' Wars of the Jews Main

Online Study Bible Main

EARLY CHURCH

Ambrose
Ambrose, Pseudo
Andreas
Arethas
Aphrahat
Athanasius
Augustine
Barnabus
BarSerapion
Baruch, Pseudo
Bede
Chrysostom
Chrysostom, Pseudo
Clement, Alexandria
Clement, Rome
Clement, Pseudo
Cyprian
Ephraem
Epiphanes
Eusebius
Gregory
Hegesippus
Hippolytus
Ignatius
Irenaeus
Isidore
James
Jerome
King Jesus
Apostle John
Lactantius
Luke
Mark
Justin Martyr
Mathetes
Matthew
Melito
Oecumenius
Origen
Apostle Paul
Apostle Peter
Maurus Rabanus
Remigius
"Solomon"
Severus
St. Symeon
Tertullian
Theophylact
Victorinus

HISTORICAL PRETERISM
(Minor Fulfillment of Matt. 24/25 or Revelation in Past)

Joseph Addison
Oswald T. Allis
Thomas Aquinas
Karl Auberlen
Augustine
Albert Barnes
Karl Barth
G.K. Beale
Beasley-Murray
John Bengel
Wilhelm Bousset
John A. Broadus

David Brown
"Haddington Brown"
F.F. Bruce

Augustin Calmut
John Calvin
B.H. Carroll
Johannes Cocceius
Vern Crisler
Thomas Dekker
Wilhelm De Wette
Philip Doddridge
Isaak Dorner
Dutch Annotators
Alfred Edersheim
Jonathan Edwards

E.B. Elliott
Heinrich Ewald
Patrick Fairbairn
Js. Farquharson
A.R. Fausset
Robert Fleming
Hermann Gebhardt
Geneva Bible
Charles Homer Giblin
John Gill
William Gilpin
W.B. Godbey
Ezra Gould
Hank Hanegraaff
Hengstenberg
Matthew Henry
G.A. Henty
George Holford
Johann von Hug
William Hurte
J, F, and Brown
B.W. Johnson
John Jortin
Benjamin Keach
K.F. Keil
Henry Kett
Richard Knatchbull
Johann Lange

Cornelius Lapide
Nathaniel Lardner
Jean Le Clerc
Peter Leithart
Jack P. Lewis
Abiel Livermore
John Locke
Martin Luther

James MacDonald
James MacKnight
Dave MacPherson
Keith Mathison
Philip Mauro
Thomas Manton
Heinrich Meyer
J.D. Michaelis
Johann Neander
Sir Isaac Newton
Thomas Newton
Stafford North
Dr. John Owen
 Blaise Pascal
William W. Patton
Arthur Pink

Thomas Pyle
Maurus Rabanus
St. Remigius

Anne Rice
Kim Riddlebarger
J.C. Robertson
Edward Robinson
Andrew Sandlin
Johann Schabalie
Philip Schaff
Thomas Scott
C.J. Seraiah
Daniel Smith
Dr. John Smith
C.H. Spurgeon

Rudolph E. Stier
A.H. Strong
St. Symeon
Theophylact
Friedrich Tholuck
George Townsend
James Ussher
Wm. Warburton
Benjamin Warfield

Noah Webster
John Wesley
B.F. Westcott
William Whiston
Herman Witsius
N.T. Wright

John Wycliffe
Richard Wynne
C.F.J. Zullig

MODERN PRETERISTS
(Major Fulfillment of Matt. 24/25 or Revelation in Past)

Firmin Abauzit
Jay Adams
Luis Alcazar
Greg Bahnsen
Beausobre, L'Enfant
Jacques Bousset
John L. Bray
David Brewster
Dr. John Brown
Thomas Brown
Newcombe Cappe
David Chilton
Adam Clarke

Henry Cowles
Ephraim Currier
R.W. Dale
Gary DeMar
P.S. Desprez
Johann Eichhorn
Heneage Elsley
F.W. Farrar
Samuel Frost
Kenneth Gentry
Steve Gregg
Hugo Grotius
Francis X. Gumerlock
Henry Hammond
Hampden-Cook
Friedrich Hartwig
Adolph Hausrath
Thomas Hayne
J.G. Herder
Timothy Kenrick
J. Marcellus Kik
Samuel Lee
Peter Leithart
John Lightfoot
Benjamin Marshall
F.D. Maurice
Marion Morris
Ovid Need, Jr
Wm. Newcombe
N.A. Nisbett
Gary North
Randall Otto
Zachary Pearce
Andrew Perriman
Beilby Porteus
Ernst Renan
Gregory Sharpe
Fr. Spadafora
R.C. Sproul
Moses Stuart
Milton S. Terry
Herbert Thorndike
C. Vanderwaal
Foy Wallace
Israel P. Warren
Chas Wellbeloved
J.J. Wetstein
Richard Weymouth
Daniel Whitby
George Wilkins
E.P. Woodward
 

FUTURISTS
(Virtually No Fulfillment of Matt. 24/25 & Revelation in 1st C. - Types Only ; Also Included are "Higher Critics" Not Associated With Any Particular Eschatology)

Henry Alford
G.C. Berkower
Alan Patrick Boyd
John Bradford
Wm. Burkitt
George Caird
Conybeare/ Howson
John Crossan
John N. Darby
C.H. Dodd
E.B. Elliott
G.S. Faber
Jerry Falwell
Charles G. Finney
J.P. Green Sr.
Murray Harris
Thomas Ice

Benjamin Jowett
John N.D. Kelly

Hal Lindsey
John MacArthur
William Miller
Robert Mounce

Eduard Reuss

J.A.T. Robinson
George Rosenmuller
D.S. Russell
George Sandison
C.I. Scofield
Dr. John Smith

Norman Snaith
"Televangelists"
Thomas Torrance
Jack/Rex VanImpe
John Walvoord

Quakers : George Fox | Margaret Fell (Fox) | Isaac Penington


PRETERIST UNIVERSALISM | MODERN PRETERISM | PRETERIST IDEALISM

 

HYPER PRETERIST ASSASSIN:

Charles Julius Guiteau

Murdered President Garfield
Executed by Hanging June 30, 1882

Member of JH Noyes' Oneida Community

http://www.lawbuzz.com/didyou/garfield/images/guiteau.jpg
Charles J. Guiteau
A True Believer in
"Preterist Reformation"

The Truth: A Companion to the Bible (1879) | A Lecture on Christ's Second Coming, A.D. 70 | The Case of Guiteau, The Assassin of President Garfield | A Complete History of the Life and Trial of Charles Julius Guiteau, Assassin | Harper's Coverage | Guitrau Books at Amazon | Who Shot Garfield? | Charles Guiteau | Blame it on Uranus

  • 12/20/12: Final expectation of Oneida Preterist - "I am now going to read some verses which are intended to indicate my feelings at the moment of leaving this world. If set to music they may be rendered very effective.. I wrote it this morning about ten o'clock "Final expectation of Oneida Preterist - "I am now going to read some verses which are intended to indicate my feelings at the moment of leaving this world. If set to music they may be rendered very effective.. I wrote it this morning about ten o'clock "

"As a child, Charles Julius Guiteau was beaten savagely by his father, who accused him continually of violating God's laws. He ran away from home as a teenager, but internalized the criticism sufficiently to become a religious fanatic. He published a plagiarized book of religious philosophy titled Truth, and eventually fetched up at John Humphrey Noyes's utopian Oneida community in New York, which taught that the second coming of Christ had occurred in 70 AD, and thus that we were all already redeemed and free of sin. Among other things, the residents of Oneida practiced free love, despite which the conspicuously unattractive Guiteau couldn't obtain a partner. The women of Oneida nicknamed him "Charles Gitout." Crispin Sartwell

"This is going to turn Christendom upside down.  I'll have more people here than I have now. Copernicus said the world was round, and everybody believed him mad. There may be some who will say I am mad."

 

QUOTES FROM "THE TRUTH"

Yes, yes, thou Paul, waited only two years for thy "crown." Thou wert executed AD 68, and thy Master came at the destruction of Jerusalem, AD70, and gavest thee thy "crown" (Guiteau, p. 30)

During all these ages, Christ has not appeared in response to this expectation, and we propose to show that the reason He has not appeared is because He came at the siege of Jerusalem, A. D. 70, "in the clouds of heaven, with power and great glory," and judged "the quick and dead," the righteous and wicked of the primitive Church and Jewish nation. This is the proposition we intend to establish by a careful review of the New Testament. " (33)

he says that the "Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven with His mighty angels, in flaming fire, taking vengeance on them that know not God and obey not the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ, who shall punish them with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of His power;" II Thess. i. 10, he speaks of Christ's coming to be glorified in "His saints, and to be admired in all them that believe in that day;" thereby meaning the day of Christ's coming, which occurred at the destruction of Jerusalem, A. D. 70, when He judged the primitive Church and Jewish nation." (48)

In the interest of a sound theology it is of the utmost importance to know the truth about Christ's second coming. It is useless for Christendom to hope and pray for His coming, because it is a fact already accomplished. They may as well look it square in the face and adapt their faith and conduct to the fact. It is believed these views are destined to revolutionize the theology of eighteen centuries. Christendom must have a new theology — a theology to fit the fact that Christ came A. D. 70. The great practical effect of this doctrine will be to establish the faith of Christendom in the Bible. This doctrine throws a calcium light upon the New Testament. It illuminates its otherwise mysterious words, verses, and chapters. No one can understand the Bible without thin view of the second coming. It is a living stream of water running through the New Testament. This doctrine is the missing link, uniting Primitive Christianity with modern Christianity, and, it is believed, Holy Ghost power will come to the church by a belief in this doctrine. Thousands have rejected the Bible, to their eternal death, on account of its apparent inconsistency, not knowing the truth concerning Christ's second coming." (53)

This doctrine ends the communion: "Do this," says Christ, "in remembrance of me, till I come." If we behold His coming eighteen centuries in the past, an ordinance commemorating Him as a conquering hero would be appropriate. A correct knowledge of Christ's second coining is almost as important as a knowledge of his first coming. (54)

For two thousand years, i. e., since His covenant with Abraham, He sent upon them the rain and sunshine of religious discipline, and the harvest was reaped at Christ's second coming. For nearly two thousand years, i. e., since Christ's coming, A. D. 70, the Gentiles have been under His care, and we believe the Gentile harvest is near at hand. We believe we are living in "the dispensation of the fullness of times" (Eph. i. 10, Rom. xi. 25) ; that the second resurrection and final judgment are in the immediate future, which will end the Gentile harvest. At the final judgment Christ will judge the world from His throne in heaven, and He has no need to return to earth for any purpose. It is not necessary, or even desirable, that Christ should return to earth again. When He was here He was badly treated. Heaven is a thousand times better than this sin-cursed earth. We submit, that our friends of the Prophetic Conference are in the dark, and we offer them this book, as the only rational solution of this matter. " (54-55)


We epitomize the history of the race thus : Adam, Noah, Abraham, Christ's birth, Christ's death and resurrection, Christ's second coming, A. D. 70. Christ's second coming is the pivotal fact of history. (55)

His appearing " in the clouds of heaven," at the destruction of Jerusalem, and the slaughter of eleven hundred thousand Jews, was the outward sign of that spiritual judgment, in which the Almighty judged the entire race, except those living on earth at the destruction of Jerusalem. All who had lived on the earth, and died, were judged at Christ's second coming, at the siege of Jerusalem, A. D. 70. (60)

There were two classes in the Primitive Church — those that expected Christ's coming and those that did not. An individual's belief or disbelief in His coming decided his final destiny. He appeared at the siege of Jerusalem "with His mighty angels," to those who were looking for Him, and took them to glory. To those who looked not for Him He came not. They were left on earth, and their seed has represented Christianity all these ages. They were the unfaithful servants of whom Christ so often spake. (61)

On nearly every page of the New Testament, we find the speedy coming of Christ "in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory," held up by the Evangelists, and especially by the Apostle Paul, as an event which would give to the "saints " of the Primitive Church, and the righteous dead of past ages, a secure and glorious redemption. It was the consummation of their effort, the reward of their faith and devotion to the Master ; and yet, for eighteen centuries, Christendom has known it not. The very curse Paul says (II Thess. ii. 11) should come upon the church, has been upon it since Christ came, A. D. 70. " And for this curse," says Paul (thereby meaning the unbelief of the Antichrist part of the Primitive Church, concerning Christ's coming, then close at hand), "God shall send them" (meaning the Antichrist part of the Primitive Church, and which Christianity since has represented), "strong delusion," that they should "believe a lie"; and Christendom, for eighteen centuries, has not known the truth touching Christ's second coming. The reason they have not known it, is because it was the Antichrist part of the Primitive Church which Christ left on earth when he judged the race at the siege of Jerusalem. It is this apostate Christianity that has assumed to represent Christ all these ages. As they forsook the coming of the Lord, so has the church, commonly called Christian, done in all ages. (61-63)

WHEN Christ appeared at the destruction of Jerusalem, A. D. 70, the entire human race (save those then living on earth,) were judged ; i. e., the " sheep " were separated from the "goats ; " z. e., the righteous went to heaven and the wicked to eternal punishment. Prior to this resurrection and judgment, the entire human race (i. e., the dead part of it,) were in Hades, awaiting their resurrection and judgment, which took place when Christ appeared at the destruction of Jerusalem." (79)

As the entire human race (i. e., the dead part of it), prior to the destruction of Jerusalem, A. D. 70, were detained in Hades, awaiting their resurrection and judgment, so the inhabitants of this earth, since A. D. 70, have been detained in Hades awaiting their resurrection and judgment, which will take place at the end of the world. Paul (he was executed A. D. 68) only waited two years in the Paradise of Hades after his death for his "crown," i. e., till Christ came, A. D. 70. Abraham,* however, was * In Luke 16: 19-31, wo, are told that a rich man interviewed Abraham, and thereby learn that Hades is composed of two wards, — the one for the righteous ; the other for the wicked. It is fortunate for us who love Christ that we live so near the judgment, as we are sure to see Him soon. (81-82)

 

NEWSPAPER RETROSPECTIVE
Chicago Tribune July 3, 1881

Mr. Guiteau made an effort to reach the public to ventilate his peculiar ideas as a lecturer.
The Tribune of Jan. 14, 1877 contained the following advertisement

'A RELIGIOUS LECTURE. CHARLES J. GUITEAU. The Lawyer and Theologian, Will Deliver for the First Time His Lecture on CHRIST'S SECOND COMING, A. D. 70, at this Clark St. Methodist Church, Saturday Evening, Jan. 20, 1877, at 8 o'clock. Doors open at 7. Admission 25 cents; free to all who can't spare 25 cents, (as he is working for the Lord and not for money. The presence of clergymen, Biblical students, and all interested in a sound theology, is requested at this lecture. It is full of live ideas which are destined, it is believed, to shake Christendom. If Christ came A. D. 70, i. e., at the destruction of Jerusalem, he never will again, and the sooner Christendom know it and adapt their faith and conduct to the fact, the better. The lecture is based on the work of Jesus Christ, the expectations of Paul, and the primitive Christians. The lecturer proposes to deliver this gospel in all the principle cities in Europe and America.'

'This argument is based, Mr. Reporter, on Matt. xiii., 24, 29, 30, 31, and I should like you to make a note of it. And I desire to call your attention, Mr. Reporter, to the pestilence, war, and famine that followed His coming. Josephus speaks of Christ as one Jesus, a country fellow who went about.

'I desire a special note of this, Mr. Reporter. People say the Bible teaches the Gospel must be preached before Christ shall come. I show that the Gospel was preached, and I would like you to take down that fact, Mr. Reporter: and He foretold the end would come. This is important, Mr. reporter, for the end did come.

'By the way, I wish you would give these references, Mr. Reporter, for these references show that the Antichrist has come." At this point the reporter stopped to sharpen his pencil, it appears, and the lecturer indulged him, and the audience tittered. Resuming he said, after numerous quotations from Revelations:

'These show that Christ has been here, but why has not Christendom known of it? This is especially important, Mr. Reporter, and I desire that you would take it down. For nineteen centuries, Mr. Reporter, Christendom has been kept in ignorance of this event. All the ministers and Biblical students ought to have come here tonight, but they didn't. You will find the Apostles' explanation of this also important, Mr. Reporter, but I shall defer consideration of it until another lecture. Nineteen centuries have been afraid to face this thing, but after I have been abroad and shaken them up a little they'll come and hear me. Moody could only raise 300 people until he went abroad.

'Here is an item about Paul, Mr. Reporter, for Paul said Christ would come again. Peter did not know what he was talking about. Please make a note of that, Mr. Reporter. The Christianity of Paul's Church has been a mockery, Mr. Reporter, and I wish you would note that fact. That is the reason the ministers are not here tonight. Moody shook them up a little, and maybe I will before I get through.

'Now, Mr. Reporter, I will give you the Biblical references only, because you will not have space for this argument. [Reads references.] They will only take seven or eight lines, Mr. Reporter: Can't you put them in? Then these ministers can look them up tomorrow.

'I have only two more items, Mr. Reporter, and I'd like you to take them. Please take these references also, Mr. Reporter. [Reading from I. John. ii,. 18] Thus you will see, Mr. Reporter, the antichrist has come. Now, Mr. Reporter, if you will note down I. John, iii., 2, and I. John, iii., 19, we will be almost through.

'We will now examine Revelation in relation to Christ's coming. After I have read the references to the reporter I will explain them to the audience. I will give you the references, Mr. Reporter. [Reads.] The substance of this is that Christ told them that He was coming quickly. The last words of John were that Christ was coming.

'Now I am almost through, Mr. Reporter. Can't you take the rest? It is short. I told Mr. Hall if he wanted any money he could have it, for I want a good report of this lecture. This is going to turn Christendom upside down. I think this is destined to combine the Christian churches take that down, Mr. Reporter. By the way, I will give you the latter part of this, Mr. Reporter, if you don't want the trouble of writing it down. Hereafter we shall roam up and down history, sacred and profane. I'll have more people here than I have now. Copernicus said the world was round, and everybody believed him mad. There may be some who will say I am mad.'"

The Assassination of President James Garfield


The Apprehension of Charles Julius Guiteau - Picture from "The Life of President Garfield"

Published in Chicago Tribune, July 3rd, 1881

"On the 4th of January, 1877, the Tribune was in receipt of a message and certain accompanying documents from Guiteau. ...The enclosure [consists of five proofs] covering an argument to show that the second coming of Christ, which the Evangelical Church is expecting some time in the indefinite future, is an accomplished fact and that it took place A. D. 70, at the time of the burning of Jerusalem. Mr. Guiteau has collected all the texts in the New Testament having reference to a second coming, and the main reason which leads him to this conclusion is that Christ Himself, in all the references which he makes to His return, used it in connection with the words 'this generation,' meaning thereby His contemporaries. Besides this, John, Paul, and other evangelists stated, without qualification, that the Savior would come before the end of the first century.

"The only witness who takes the contrary view, says Mr. Guiteau, is Peter, who states in one of his epistles that, at the time of Christ's coming, this globe which we inhabit is to be burned up. Mr. Guiteau upsets this, however, by the statement that Peter was a bold, impulsive, unlearned man, blameworthy in many things. He thrice denied his Lord and once rebuked his Master. It is nearly 1,900 years since Peter wrote, and yet this globe has not been burned up. Hence, Mr. Guiteau concludes, that Peter's opinion that Christ's coming and the burning up of the earth were to be simultaneous events savors of the things of man and not of God. Mr. Guiteau objects to the testimony of Peter, and puts him out of court.

"He also fortifies his conclusion that Christ came the second time at the siege of Jerusalem, by stating that the locality of His coming was necessarily the place of His greatest early agony. He was crucified at Jerusalem. There are in addition other points drawn from Josephus, the American Encyclopedia, and other publications, which confirm Mr. G. in his conclusions.

"The coming of antichrist is also proven, and Mr. Guiteau promises to develop the theorem that the antichrist part of the primitive church and its successor, modern Christianity, are one and that same. While admitting that many righteous people, himself included, have lived since A.D. 70, yet Christianity, as a church organization, has been a mockery.

"These views Mr. Guiteau is ready to defend at any time and place, and proposes to renounce [his] law [practice] and devote his life to preaching this particular gospel, which he believes will shake Christendom worse than Martin Luther did three centuries ago. His eye, he says, is upon eternity; and he expects to go abroad this spring. If he can convert Great Britain to the gospel of the Second Coming, he can soon get America, the rest of Christendom, Africa, and the islands of the sea under his thumb.

"Persons desiring his services as a preacher of this special creed can address him at No. 144 Dear-born street, car-fare enclosed. Mr. Guiteau explains in his letter that this is a great discovery, and that he has sent copies to the other city papers for simultaneous publication. He adds that he would be pleased to have Moody, Swing, Cheney, and others of the clergy, as well as Storrs, Reed, and other lawyers interviewed about the matter, which, he believes is destined to turn Christendom upside down.

"Following this, and ten days later Mr. Guiteau made an effort to reach the public to ventilate his peculiar ideas as a lecturer. The Tribune of Jan. 14 contained the following advertisement:

'A RELIGIOUS LECTURE. CHARLES J. GUITEAU. The Lawyer and Theologian, Will Deliver for the First Time His Lecture on CHRIST'S SECOND COMING, A. D. 70, at this Clark St. Methodist Church, Saturday Evening, Jan. 20, 1877, at 8 o'clock. Doors open at 7. Admission 25 cents; free to all who can't spare 25 cents, (as he is working for the Lord and not for money. The presence of clergymen, Biblical students, and all interested in a sound theology, is requested at this lecture. It is full of live ideas which are destined, it is believed, to shake Christendom. If Christ came A. D. 70, i. e., at the destruction of Jerusalem, he never will again, and the sooner Christendom know it and adapt their faith and conduct to the fact, the better. The lecture is based on the work of Jesus Christ, the expectations of Paul, and the primitive Christians. The lecturer proposes to deliver this gospel in all the principle cities in Europe and America.'

He is, it is said, "a vigorous and pleasant speaker," and begs leave to request a large attendance. The report of the much-heralded lecture, which appeared in these columns Sunday, Jan 21, 1877, was interesting reading at the time, and is doubly so now. His audience, it appears, consisted of seven ladies and fifteen gentlemen, notwithstanding the bills announced that it was free to all who could not spare 25-cents admission fee. The receipts were only $1.85, the report set forth, but the lecturer was by no means discouraged, and saw that the reporter was provided with every facility to do his work. Starting out by quoting the prophecies of the Bible about the coming of Christ, which was proof of his position, he addressed himself especially to the scribe, who was apparently his most attentive hearer, in the following words:

'This argument is based, Mr. Reporter, on Matt. xiii., 24, 29, 30, 31, and I should like you to make a note of it. And I desire to call your attention, Mr. Reporter, to the pestilence, war, and famine that followed His coming. Josephus speaks of Christ as one Jesus, a country fellow who went about.

'I desire a special note of this, Mr. Reporter. People say the Bible teaches the Gospel must be preached before Christ shall come. I show that the Gospel was preached, and I would like you to take down that fact, Mr. Reporter: and He foretold the end would come. This is important, Mr. reporter, for the end did come.

'By the way, I wish you would give these references, Mr. Reporter, for these references show that the Antichrist has come." At this point the reporter stopped to sharpen his pencil, it appears, and the lecturer indulged him, and the audience tittered. Resuming he said, after numerous quotations from Revelations:

'These show that Christ has been here, but why has not Christendom known of it? This is especially important, Mr. Reporter, and I desire that you would take it down. For nineteen centuries, Mr. Reporter, Christendom has been kept in ignorance of this event. All the ministers and Biblical students ought to have come here tonight, but they didn't. You will find the Apostles' explanation of this also important, Mr. Reporter, but I shall defer consideration of it until another lecture. Nineteen centuries have been afraid to face this thing, but after I have been abroad and shaken them up a little they'll come and hear me. Moody could only raise 300 people until he went abroad.

'Here is an item about Paul, Mr. Reporter, for Paul said Christ would come again. Peter did not know what he was talking about. Please make a note of that, Mr. Reporter. The Christianity of Paul's Church has been a mockery, Mr. Reporter, and I wish you would note that fact. That is the reason the ministers are not here tonight. Moody shook them up a little, and maybe I will before I get through.

'Now, Mr. Reporter, I will give you the Biblical references only, because you will not have space for this argument. [Reads references.] They will only take seven or eight lines, Mr. Reporter: Can't you put them in? Then these ministers can look them up tomorrow.

'I have only two more items, Mr. Reporter, and I'd like you to take them. Please take these references also, Mr. Reporter. [Reading from I. John. ii,. 18] Thus you will see, Mr. Reporter, the antichrist has come. Now, Mr. Reporter, if you will note down I. John, iii., 2, and I. John, iii., 19, we will be almost through.

'We will now examine Revelation in relation to Christ's coming. After I have read the references to the reporter I will explain them to the audience. I will give you the references, Mr. Reporter. [Reads.] The substance of this is that Christ told them that He was coming quickly. The last words of John were that Christ was coming.

'Now I am almost through, Mr. Reporter. Can't you take the rest? It is short. I told Mr. Hall if he wanted any money he could have it, for I want a good report of this lecture. This is going to turn Christendom upside down. I think this is destined to combine the Christian churches take that down, Mr. Reporter. By the way, I will give you the latter part of this, Mr. Reporter, if you don't want the trouble of writing it down. Hereafter we shall roam up and down history, sacred and profane. I'll have more people here than I have now. Copernicus said the world was round, and everybody believed him mad. There may be some who will say I am mad.'"


[End of Chicago Tribune excerpt]

Next Page

From The Decatur Daily Republican, July 5, 1881:

"John F. Morris, of Hartford, has in his possession the lecture on "Christ's Second Coming, A. D. 70," by Charles J. Guiteau, styling himself a Chicago lawyer and theologian, published in Washington in November, 1870. The lecture is to prove that the second coming of Christ occurred at the siege and destruction of Jerusalem, A. D. 70, and consists largely in extracts from the word of Jesus and from the various Epistles."

Amazon.com has a listing for Charles J. Guiteau's "A Lecture on Christ's Second Coming, A.D. 70" (currently not available).

Charles Guiteau had been an off-and-on member of the preteristic, "free love" cult known as the Oneida Community from about 1865-70. Guiteau's father was a personal friend of the cult's founder, John Humphrey Noyes. Guiteau was considered mentally unbalanced and even "insane" by his fellow cult members (and by most other people who had dealings with him). The women of the cult had rejected him and nicknamed him "Charles Gitout."



A Bibliography of Sources Relating to Charles J. Guiteau
Compiled by Libby Chenault for the Bullitt Club 11/08/05

Guiteau, Charles J.: A LECTURE ON CHRIST'S SECOND COMING 70 A.D. Hartford. 1878. 30pp. plus original frontispiece portrait. Original printed wrappers bound in modern red cloth, leather label. Despite John Wilkes Booth's considerable dramatic abilities, Charles Guiteau is the only assassin of a President to be published. Not that this odd bit of revelation is any literary masterpiece; the theme suggests the imbalance of mind which led him to shoot the unoffending President Garfield four years later. Marked "Second Edition" on the cover, but we cannot find anyone who has seen the first. Guiteau items are, needless to say, quite rare. This copy includes an original photographic portrait of Guiteau supplied as a frontispiece."


Alexander, Henry H. The Life of Guiteau and the Official History of the Most Exciting Case on Record: Being the Trial of Guiteau for Assassinating Pres. Garfield. Des Moines, Ia.: W. H. McClain, 1882.
Philadelphia: National Pub. Co., 1882.

Alger, Horatio, Jr. From Canal Boy to President, Or the Boyhood and Manhood of James A. Garfield. By Horatio Alger, Jr., Author of Ragged Dick; Luck and Pluck; Tattered Tom, Etc. Illustrated. New York: John R. Anderson & Company, No. 17 Murray Street. 1881. Copyright, 1881 by John R. Anderson & Co. Edward O. Jenkins, Printer and Stereotyper, 20 North William Street, New York.

The American Experience. Insanity on Trial. United States: WETA‑TV, 1990.
Alexandria, Va.: PBS Video, 1990.

Das Attentat auf Prasident James A. Garfield: Der einzigeWahrheitsgetreue un ausfuhrliche Bericht, verbunden mit der Lebensbeschreibung unseres Prasidenten, sowie die des Meuchelmorders Charles Guiteau. Philadelphia: Barclay & Co., Hrsg., 1881.

Ausenhaus, Peter. Journalism in National Crises: A Cultural History of the Garfield and McKinley Assassinations. A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota by Peter Ausenhaus in Partial Fufillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Arts. September 1992.

Badmen and Heroes. Ekektra, 1955.

Balch, William Ralston. The Life of James Abram Garfield, Late President of the United States. The Record of a Wonderful Career Which, Like That of Abraham Lincoln, By Native Energy and Untiring Industry, Led Its Hero from Obscurity to the Foremost Position in the American Nation. Together with a Full Account of His Election to the Presidency, Momentous Events of His Brief Administration, Assassination, Surgical Treatment, the Sympathy of the Nation, Removal to Elberon, Death, Autopsy, Funeral Obsequies, Interment, Etc., Etc., Etc. By William Ralston Balch, Managing Editor of The American. Published by Hubbard Bros., Philadelphia, PA.; Boston, Mass.; Chicago, Ill.; Cincinnati, O.; Atlanta, Ga.; Kansas City, Mo.: C.R. Blackall & Co., New York: World Publishing Company, Guelph, Canada: A.L. Bancroft & Co., San Francisco, Cal.: John Burns, St. Louis, Mo. Copyrighted, 1881.

Bancroft, William Dixon. McKinley—Garfield—Lincoln. Their Lives—Their Deeds—Their Deaths. With a Record of Notable Assassinations and A History of Anarchy. By William Dixon Bancroft. | Memorial Edition. | Magnificently Illustrated with Engravings from Original Photographs, Drawings, Paintings and Sketches. | Published by The United States Newspaper Syndicate. Chicago and New York. Copyright, 1901 by John R. Foster.

Beard, George Miller. “The Case of Guiteau: A Psychological Study.” Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Vol. 9, no. 1 (January, 1882): 90-125.

________. The Case of Guiteau: A Psychological Study. [S.l.: s.n.,] 1882. (Reprinted from the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Vol.9, no. 1 (January, 1882): 90-125).

________. “Petition for a Stay of Proceedings in the Case of Guiteau,” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Vol. CVI, No. 22 (June 1, 1882): 524-525.

________. The Psychology of the Salem Witchcraft Excitement of 1692, and Its Practical Application to Our Own Time. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1882.
Stratford, Conn.: J. E. Edwards, 1971. (Reprint of the 1882 ed. Limited to 500 copies.)

Beckham, Stephen D.; Cox, Patricia J. “Ballad of Charles Guiteau”: An Oregon Version, 1968. Northwest Folklore, Eugene, OR. vol. 3 no. 2, 1968, pp. 30‑31.

Beebe, Dick. The Guiteau Burlesque. 1984. [Program review by Evan Yionoulis]

Bell, Alexander Graham. Upon the Electrical Experiments to Determine the Location of the Bullet in the Body of the Late President Garfield; And Upon A Successful Form of Induction Balance For the Painless Detection of Metallic Masses in the Human Body. (A Paper Read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, At the Montreal Meeting, August 1882.) With an Appendix. For Private Circulation. Washington, D.C.: Gibson Brothers, Printers, 1882. At head of title: With the Author’s Compliments.

Bell, Charles Milton. Group Photograph of the Jury in the Case of the United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau [reproduction]. ca. 1881.

________. Portrait Photograph of Charles Julius Guiteau. July 4, 1881.

________. Portrait Photograph of Charles Julius Guiteau. ca. 1881.

Biel, Steven. “Unknown and Unsung: Contested Meanings of the Titanic Disaster. In: Print Culture in a Diverse America. Edited by James P. Danky and Wayne A. Wiegand. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1998. Pp. 203-222.

Bigelow, J. G. Review of the Case of Sergeant John A. Mason, of Battery B, 2d U.S. Artillery, Convicted by General Court-Martial of an Assault with Intent to Kill Charles A. Guiteau, the Assassin.

“Biographical Sketch by Charles J. Guiteau.” Washington, D.C. Evening Star. [June 30,] 1882.

Blaine, James G. Blaine. Eulogy on James Abram Garfield. Delivered Before the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States. February 27, 1882. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1882.

________. James A. Garfield. Memorial Address Pronounced in the Hall of Representatives, February 27, 1882, Before the Departments of the Government of the United States, By James G. Blaine, In Response to an Invitation from the Two Houses of Congress. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1882.

Bliss, D. W. “Report of the Case of President Garfield.” The Medical Record 20(1881): 393-402.

Boorstein, Daniel. The Americans: The National Experience. New York: Random House, 1965.

Brand, Oscar. Program Nine: Bad Men Ballads. (Celebrate America. An American Folksong Archive; unit 9). Westport, CT: Westport Media, 1972. [My name is Charles Guiteau.]

Brooks, Stewart M. Our Murdered Presidents. New York: Bell Publishing Co., 1966.

Buckham, T. R., A.M., M.D. Insanity Considered in Its Medico-Legal Relations. “Ordinari Res Ipsa, Negat, Contenta Dolceri.” Philadelphia and London: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1883.

Buckley, J. M. “A Study of Guiteau.” New York Christian Advocate 57 (January 12, 1882): 17-18.

Bucknill, John Charles. “The Plea of Insanity in the Case of Charles Julius Guiteau.” American Journal of Insanity 39 (October 1882): 181-98.

Buffalo Courier. July 3, 1881.

Bunnell, C. B. Washington, D.C.: The Closing Act in the Tragedy of President Garfield's Assassination : Guiteau's Last Look from the Scaffold, the Moment Before Execution. [New York: Frank Leslie], 1882. (Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, July 8, 1882, p. 312‑313).

Bury Me Beneath the Willow: A Treasury of Southern Mountain Folksongs and Ballads. (Folk Music of the World). New York; Washington, 195-?

Butler, Edward Hubert. “Extra! President Garfield Assassinated!” Buffalo Evening News. July 2, 1881.

By Reason of Insanity: American Psychiatry and the Trial of Charles Guiteau. Presented by the Oskar Diethelm Library, Department of Psychiatry, Cornell University Medical College and the New York Hospital at the New York Academy of Medicine. April 13-June 30, 1998. [Exhibition checklist].

Caleb Carr. The Alienist. A Novel. New York: Random House, 1994.

Cansler, Loman D. Missouri Folk Songs. New York City: Folkways Records, 1959. [Charles Guiteau]

Cassity, John Holland, M. D. The Quality of Murder. A Psychiatric and Legal Evaluation of the Motives and Responsibilities Involved in the Plea of Insanity as Revealed in Outstanding Murder Cases of this Century. Introduction by James D. C. Murray. New York: The Julian Press, Inc., 1958.

Channing, Walter. “The Mental Status of Guiteau.” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Vol. CVI, No. 13 (March 30,1882): 290-296.

________. The Mental Status of Guiteau, the Assassin of President Garfield. Cambridge: Riverside Press, 1882. (Reprinted from the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal of March 30, 1882).

Chs. Guiteau, le Meurtrier du President Garfield: Pendu le 30 Juin 1882, à Washington, E.U. [France: s.n.,] 1882, 1883.

Clark, James C. The Murder of James A. Garfield: The President’s Last Days and the Trial and Execution of His Assassin. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1993.

Clark, Thomas D. “My Name Is Charles Guiteau. The Trial of President Garfield’s assassin Produced One of the Nation’s Most Macabre Spectacles.” American Heritage n.s. v.2, no. 4, 14-17, 69.

Clark & Wood’s Funny Guiteau Songster: A Collection of Comic and Sentimental Songs as Sung by Fred H. Clark and W. Frank Wood. Peoria, Ill.: J. I. Lighthall, 1880-1889

Clarke, James W. American Assassins: The Darker Side of Politics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982, 198-213.

Clemmer, Mary. “A Woman’s Letter from Washington. The Assassination.” Independent 33 (July 21, 1881): 1-3.

Cohen, Patricia Cline. The Murder of Helen Jewett. The Life and Death of a Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century New York. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1998.

Coleman, Joe. Infernal Machine. London: Blast First, 1990.

Corkhill, George B. The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau. Opening Statement by George B. Corkhill, United States District Attorney. November 17, 1881. Washington, 1881.

Coulter, John. Our Martyr Presidents Lincoln : Garfield : McKinley. Their Illustrious Lives, Public and Private, and Their Glorious Deeds, Biographies, Speeches and Stories. Together with Histories of Noted Assassins and Assassinations, and Anarchy and Anarchists in the United States and Europe. By John Coulter with an Introduction by Hon. Shelby M. Cullom Senior United States Senator from Illinois. Superbly Illustrated with Etchings and Half-tones from Original Photographs and Drawings by William Schmedtgen, Hugo Von Hofsten and Other Noted Artists. Published by The Memorial Publishing House. Copyright, 1901 by William D. Warren.

The Crime Avenged; Or, Guiteau on the Gallows … A Complete Secret History of the Career, Crime, Jail Life, Trial and Execution of Charles J. Guiteau for the Murder of President Garfield. New York: R. E. Fox, 1882. Sequel to Guiteau’s Crime and The Assassin’s Doom.

Crotty, William J. “Presidential Assassinations.” Society 9 (May 1972): 18-29.

Davidson, J. O. Incidents of the Trial of Charles Jules Guiteau. [New York: Harper], 1881. (Harper’s Weekly, Dec. 3, 1881, 805).

________. The Trial of Charles Jules Guiteau: A Scene in Court. [New York: Harper], 1881. (Harper’s Weekly, Dec. 3, 1881, 804).

Diagrams of Guiteau’s Head. According to the Government’s Medical Experts. [Washington, D.C.? 1882?]

Dickinson, Emily. Final Harvest: Emily Dickinson’s Poems. Selection and Introduction by Thomas H. Johnson. Boston, Toronto: Little Brown and Company, 1961.

Dodge, M. A. “Charles J. Guiteau and the Spoils System.” North American Review 135 (1882): 76.

Donovan, Robert J. The Assassins. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1952, 14-62.

Doyle, Burton T. and Homer W. Swaney. Lives of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur with a Brief Sketch of the Assassin. Illustrated. A Complete Record of President Garfield’s Long Struggle with Death, Including Daily Bulletins, and Selections from His Best Speeches; Also, An Appendix, Giving Accounts of All Inaugurations from Washington to Garfield, All Presidents Who Died in Office, and All Assassinations of Rulers in the Present Century. Compiled by Burton T. Doyle and Homer W. Swaney. Washington, D.C.: Rufus H. Darby, Printer and Publisher, 1881.

Emrich, Duncan. Songs and Ballads of American History, and of the Assassination of Presidents. (Folk music of the United States). Washington, D.C.: Recording Laboratory, Library of Congress Division of Music, 1990, 1952. [Charles Guiteau].

________. Songs and Ballads of American History, and of the Assassination of Presidents. (Folk music of the United States). Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, Division of Music, Recording Laboratory, 1952, 1937. [Mr. Garfield ‑‑ Charles Guiteau]

Edmunds, George F. “The Conduct of the Guiteau Trial.” North American Review 134 (March 1882): 221-81.

________. “Guiteau: A Case of Alleged Moral Insanity.” Alienist and Neurologist 4 (April 1883): 193-201.

________. "Guiteau—A Case of Alleged Moral Insanity: A Rejoinder to the Reply of E. C. Spitzka, M.D." Alienist and Neurologist 4 (October 1883): 621-45.

Excerpts from Opinions of Distinguished Medical Men In This and Other Countries Justifying the Treatment of the Late President Garfield, Together With A Letter In Reply to the Resolution of the Special Committee of the House of Representatives Referring to the Expenses Consequent upon His Illness and Death. Washington, D.C.: Gibson Brothers, Printers, 1882.

Eyre, L. L. “Question of Jurisdiction in the Case of Charles J. Guiteau.” International Review 12 (1882): 390.

Farquhar, Michael. “The Other Assassinations. Lincoln and JFK Are Remembered, But What About Garfield and McKinley?” Washington Post, January 12, 2000, H1.

Fenning, Frederick Alexander. The Trial of Guiteau. [Baltimore: s.n.,] 1933. (Reprinted from American Journal of Psychiatry XIII (July 1933): 127-139).

________. “The Trial of Guiteau.” American Journal of Psychiatry XIII (July 1933): 127-139.

Fisher, Theodore Willis “Was Guiteau Sane and Responsible for the Assassination of President Garfield?” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Vol. CVI, No. 26 (June 29, 1882): 601-05.

________. Was Guiteau Sane and Responsible for the Assassination of President Garfield? Read Before the Boston Medico-Psychological Society, April 6, 1882, and the Association of Medical Superintendents for American Institutions for the Insane at Cincinnati, June 9, 1882. (Reprinted from the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal of June 29, 1882.) Cambridge: Printed at the Riverside Press. 1882.

Folsom, Charles F. “The Case of Guiteau, Assassin of the President of the United States.” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal 106 (February 16, 1882): 145-153.

________. “Reply From Dr. C. F. Folsom.” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal 106 (March 30, 1882): 307-308.

________. “The Responsibility of Guiteau.” American Law Review 16 (February 1882): 85-100.

Fox, Richard K. The Full History of the Murder of President James A. Garfield. New York: Police Gazette, 1882.

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. 1881-1882.

Freedman, Laurence Z. “Psychopathology of Assassination.” Assassinations and the Political Order. Ed. by William J. Crotty. New York: Harper and Row, 1971, 143-160.

Friedman, Lawrence M. Crime and Punishment in American History. New York: Basic Books, 1993.

Geary, Rick. The Fatal Bullet. A True Account of the Assassination, Lingering Pain, Death, and Burial of James A. Garfield, Twentieth President of the United States. Also Including The Inglorious Life and Career of the Despised Assassin Guiteau. Adapted & Illustrated by Rick Geary. NBM Comic Lit. New York: Nantier-Beall-Minoustchine Publishing Inc., 1999.

Gillam, Bernard. “If This be Madness, There Is Method in It!” Puck. November 30, 1881.

Godding, William Whitney. “The Last Chapter in the Life of Guiteau.” Alienist and Neurologist 3 (October 1882): 550-57.

________. The Last Chapter in the Life of Guiteau. [St. Louis, Mo.:] EV.E. Carreras, Steam Printer, Publisher and Binder, 1882. (Reprinted from The Alienist and Neurologist, October, 1882).

________. Two Hard Cases; Sketches from a Physician’s Portfolio. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1882.

Godkin, E. L. “Charles J. Guiteau and the Experts.” Nation: A Weekly Journal Devoted to Politics, Literature, Science and Art 34 (1882): 536.

________. “Trial of Charles J. Guiteau.” Nation: A Weekly Journal Devoted to Politics, Literature, Science and Art 34 (1882): 93.

Goldschmidt, William. The Ark of the United States Against the Political Deluge, Produced by General Corruption Which Threatens to Destroy Us. With Two Pictures (Refering [sic] to the Contents,) Namely, 1. Lincoln and Garfield, Victims of Assassins, 2. Booth and Guiteau, the Assassins. With an Appendix Project for a Well Organized Industrial Saving Bank for Working Men. New York, 1881. [Cover date 1882; copyright date 1881].

Gorscak, John T. The Preparation and Performance of the Role of Charles Guiteau in Assassins. 1993.

Gray, John Purdue. “Review of the Trial of Charles J. Guiteau.” American Journal of Insanity 38 (January 1882): 303-448.

[________.] The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau. Review of the Trial. [Reprinted from the American Journal of Insanity, January and April, 1882.]

The Great Guiteau Trial: With Life of the Cowardly Assassin. A Full Account! A Complete History! The Judge’s Charge to the Jury. Speeches of Counsel on Both Sides. Likenesses of All the Parties Concerned. Guiteau as a “Theologian,” A Politician, A “Tramp Lawyer,” “A Society Beat,” and as a Member of the Oneida Community. Philadelphia: Published by Barclay & Co., c. 1881.

Grinnell, Charles E. “Concerning Some Criticisms upon the Trial of Guiteau.” American Law Review 16 (January 1882): 50-55.

________. Points of Law for Lawyers and General Readers, Suggested by Guiteau’s Case. Boston: Little, Brown, 1881.

Grob, Gerald N. Mental Illness and American Society, 1875-1940. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983.

Der Grosse Guiteau-Prozess : Nebst der Lebenbeschreibung des feigen Morders. Vollstandige alles enthaltende Geschichte. Ansprache des Richters and die Gesworenen. Reden der beiderseitigen Anwalte. Bilder aller Betheiligten. Philadelphia: Barclay & Co., 1882.

Guiteau, Charles Julius. “Autobiography.” New York Herald 6 October 1881, 5-6.

________. “Garfield against Hancock: A Speech by Charles Guiteau of Illinois.” New York: Republican National Committee, 1881.

________. “Grant Against Hancock.” Privately Printed, 1880.

________. A Lecture On Christ’s Second Coming, A. D. 70, By Charles J. Guiteau. [Washington, 1877.]

________. Letters of Charles J. Guiteau. File No. 14056. National Archives.

________. Letters. Chicago Historical Society.

________. [Newspaper Clippings Relating to the Trial of Charles Guiteau: Assassin of President James Garfield]. 1881-1882. 1 v. (Newspaper clippings spanning December 3, 1881 to January 23, 1882 from the N.Y. World, N.Y. Herald, N.Y. Daily Tribune, Philadelphia Times, Republican, Post, Star, Times, Gazette and Critic).

________. A Reply to Recent Attacks on the Bible, Together with Some Valuable Ideas on Christ's Second Coming and on Hades, or the Resting Place of the Dead. Privately Printed, 1878. [Syracuse: Masters & Stone, 1878. 28 p.]

________. The Truth: A Companion to the Bible. Boston: Privately Printed [D. Lothrop and Company], 1879.

________. The Truth, and The Removal. Washington, 1882.

Guiteau, Charles Julius, defendant. A Complete History of the Trial of Charles Julius Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. H. G. Hayes, reporter. Philadelphia: Hubbard, 1882.

________. A Complete History of the Trial of Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. To Which Is Added a Graphic Sketch of His Life as Detailed Expressly for This Work by His Former Wife, Mrs. Dunmire; Also, an Autobiography, As Dictated by Himself Since the Shooting. Philadelphia: Hubbard Bros., 1882.

________. Report of the Proceedings in the Case of the United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau, Tried in the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Holding a Criminal Term, and Beginning November 14, 1881. Washington: G.P.O., 1882.

________. The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau. [s.l.: s.n.], 1881.

________. The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau (Criminal case no. 14056). Printed documents. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1977. 1 microfilm reel.

________. The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau. New York: Arno Press, 1973. Mental Illness and Social Policy: The American Experience. (Reprint of a 2‑vol. set in the University of Virginia Law Library. (Contents: Opinion of John P. Gray, M.D. ... on the Question of the Sanity of the Prisoner. Washington, 1882.‑‑In the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia ... The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau; [Report of the Proceedings].‑‑Bill of exceptions).

Guiteau, John Wilson. Letters and Facts, Not Heretofore Published, Touching the Mental Condition of Charles J. Guiteau since 1865. Submitted to the President of the United States in the Matter of the Application for a Commission De Lunatico Inquirendo. [Washington?: s.n.,] 1882.

________. Letters and Facts Not Heretofore Published, Touching The Mental Condition of Charles J. Guiteau Since 1865. Submitted to the President of the United States by John W. Guiteau, In the Matter of the Application for a Commission De Lunatico Inquirendo. New York: J. K. Lees, Book and Job Printer, 196 and 179 Fulton Street, [1882].

Guiteau: His Crime, His Trial and His Execution. Washington: Critic, 1882.

“Guiteau—Finis.” Medical News 41 (July 1, 1882): 12.

Guiteau’s Confession! Of the Assassination of Garfield. [Broadside] [s.n., s.d.]

Guiteau’s Confession! Of the Assassination of Garfield. [Broadside] [s.n.,] 1881.

Guiteau’s Confession. The Garfield Assassination: Being a Full History of This Cruel Crime. How It was Done and Why It was Done!! Philadelphia: The Old Franklin Publishing House, 1881.

“Guiteaumania.” British Medical Journal. June 24, 1882. Reprinted in American Journal of Insanity 39 (July 1882-83): 62-68.

Halttunen, Karen. Murder Most Foul: The Killer and the American Gothic Imagination. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Hamilton, Allan McLane. “The Case of Guiteau.” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal 106 (March 9, 1882): 235-38.

________. “In Re Guiteau,” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. CVI, No. 14 (April 6, 1882): 334-335.

________. Recollections of an Alienist, Personal and Professional. New York: George H. Doran, 1916.

Hammond, William A., M.D. “Madness and Murder,” North American Review, 148 (1888): 626-37.

________. “The Non-Asylum Treatment of the Insane,” Medical Society of the State of N. Y. Transactions (1879): 280-297.

________. “The Punishability of the Insane,” International Review, 11 (1881): 440-50.

________. Reasoning Mania: Its Medical and Medico-Legal Relations; With Special Reference to the Case of Charles J. Guiteau. By William A. Hammond, M.D. Surgeon-General U.S. Army (Retired List), Professor of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System in the University of New York, Etc. (Reprinted from the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Vol. IX, No. 1 (January, 1882): 1-26).

“Hanged, President Garfield’s Assassin ‘Removed.’” Syracuse, N.Y. The Evening Herald, June 30, 1882, 6: 1699.

Hanging of Guiteau! Pictorial History of his Crime and Execution. New York, 1882. (National Police Gazette).

Harper’s Weekly: A Journal of Civilization. Special edition. Friday, July 8, 1881. New York: Harper, 1881. (Special edition concerning the assassination of President Garfield by Charles Guiteau. Cover picture caption: The tragedy at Washington : the assassin Charles Jules Guiteau).

Harper’s Weekly. 1881-1882, 1896.

Hastings, Donald W. “The Psychiatry of Presidential Assassination, Part II: Garfield and McKinley.” Lancet 85 (April 1965): 157-62.

Hayes, Henry Gillespie and C. J. Hayes. A Complete History of the Trial of Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. To Which Is Added A Graphic Sketch of His Life As Detailed (Expressly for this Work) By His Former Wife, Mrs. Dunmire: Also, An Autobiography, As Dictated By Himself Since The Shooting. This History of the Trial (In Many Respects, The Most Remarkable of the Present Century), Gives All the Most Important and Interesting Portions of the Testimony, The Startling Interruptions by the Prisoner, Incidents, Arguments of Counsel, Charge by the Judge, Sentence, &c., &c., As Reported and Edited by H.G. and C.J. Hayes. Special Stenographic Reporters for the N. Y. Associated Press. Amply Illustrated. Philadelphia: Hubbard Bros., 1882.

________. A Complete History of the Trial of Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. A Carefully Prepared History of the Trial, In Many Respects, The Most Remarkable of the Present Century, Giving All the Most Important and Interesting Portions of the Testimony, The Startling Interruptions by the Prisoner, Incidents, Arguments of Counsel, Charge by the Judge, Sentence, &c., &c., As Edited from the Stenographic Reports of H. G. and C. J. Hayes. Special Reporters for the N. Y. Associated Press. Amply Illustrated. Philadelphia: Hubbard Bros., 1882.

________. A Complete History of the Trial of Charles Julius Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. A Carefully Prepared History of the Trial, In Many Respects the Most Remarkable of the Present Century, Giving All the Most Important and Interesting Portions of the Testimony, The Startling Interruptions by the Prisoner, Incidents, Arguments of the Counsel, Charge by the Judge, Sentence, &c., &c., As Edited from the Stenographic Reports of H.G. and C.J. Hayes, Special Reporters for the N. Y. Associated Press. Amply Illustrated. Philadelphia: Hubbard Brothers, 1882. [Paperback].

Hayes, Henry Gillespie. A Complete History of the Life and Trial of Charles Julius Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. A Graphic Sketch of His Erratic Career as Detailed ‑‑ By His Former Wife, Mrs. Dunmire. Also, an Autobiography, as Dictated by Himself Since the Shooting. And a Carefully Prepared History of the Trial. Philadelphia: Boston: Hubbard Bros., 1882.

________. A Complete History of the Life and Trial of Charles Julius Guiteau, Assassin of President Garfield. Philadelphia, Boston: Hubbard Bros., 1882.

Herbert, George B. Guiteau, The Assassin. Full Details of His Trial for the Murder of President James A. Garfield.| The Crime, Its Causes and Consequences. Graphic Scenes in Court; The Oral, Documentary and Expert Evidence; The Remarkable Statements of the Prisoner on the Stand; Speeches and Addresses of Counsel; Sketches of the Principal Characters Engaged in this World-Famous Criminal Trial. By George B. Herbert, Journalist and Author of the Life of General Winfield Scott Hancock, etc. Profusely Illustrated. . At head of title: The Great State Trial. Philadelphia: Published by William Flint, 1881
Philadelphia: H.W. Kelley, 1881.

Hicks, William W. Reverend William W. Hicks Diary and Letters. Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard Medical Library, Cambridge, Mass.

________. “The True Story of Guiteau.” New York Sunday World (Nov. 12, 19, 26, and Dec. 3, 1893).

Hinson, Glenn. Interview by author, email correspondence, 9 November 2001.

Hoyt, Rev. James S., D. D. The Death Of President Garfield. A Sermon Preached at Prospect Street Church, September 25, 1881. Cambridge, Mass., 1881.

Hughes, Charles H. “A Psychical Analysis of a Legally Sane Character: The Mental Status of Guiteau as Gleaned from His Speech and Conduct.” Alienist and Neurologist 3 (October 1882): 588-617.

Ireland, William Wotherspoon. Through the Ivory Gate: Studies in Psychology and History. New York, Edinburgh: Putnam; Bell & Bradfute, 1889.

Jackson, E. Hilton. “The Trial of Guiteau.” Virginia Law Register 9 (1904): 1023-35.

Jewett, Sarah Orne. “The Plea of Insanity.” The Congregationalist 34:2 (11 January 1882): 1.

Kammen, Michael. Mystic Chords of Memory. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1991.

Kaye, Neil S., M.D. “Feigned Insanity in Nineteenth-Century America Legal Cases. http://www.courtpsychiatrist.com/feigned.html

Kerwood, John R. “The Assassination of Garfield and the Trial of his Killer.” American History Illustrated. Vol. III, No. 10 (February 1969): 12-25.

Kiernan, James G. “The Case of Guiteau.” Chicago Medical Bulletin. 4 (1881): 544-545.

________. Simulation of Insanity by the Insane. [St. Louis, Mo.:] EV.E. Carreras, Steam Printer, Publisher and Binder, 1882. (Reprinted from the Alienist and Neurologist, April, 1882.)

King. The Religious Affiliations of our Presidential Assassins. [Typescript]. [1927?]

Kirkham, James F., Sheldon G. Levy, and William J. Crotty. Assassination and Political Violence: A Report to the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1969.

Lamb, Daniel Smith. “The Autopsy of Guiteau: The Official Report.” Alienist and Neurologist 3 (July 1882): 468-470.

________. Report of the Post-Mortem Examination of the Body of Chas. J. Guiteau, Who Died by Hanging June 30, 1882, at the United States Jail, Washington, D.C., in Execution of Judicial Sentence. Philadelphia: [s.n.]; Dornan, printer, 1882. (Reprinted from The Medical News, July 8 and Sept. 9 1882).

________ et al. “Report of the Microscopical Examination of the Body of Charles J. Guiteau, Who Died by Hanging June 30, 1882, at the United States Jail, Washington, D.C., in Execution of Judicial Sentence,” Alienist and Neurologist III (1882): 666-671.

Lawson, John D., ed. “The Trial of Charles J. Guiteau for the Murder of President Garfield.” In American State Trials: A Collection of Important and Interesting Criminal Trials. 14 (1923): 1-158. St. Louis: Thomas Law Book Co., 1923.

Lewis, Lloyd and Henry Justin Smith. Oscar Wilde Discovers America [1882]. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1974.

Life and Death of President Garfield. New York: N. L. Munro, 1881.

The Life and Death of James A. Garfield: From the Tow Path to the White House. Together with a Complete Account of his Assassination; History of Charles J. Guiteau, the Assassin; the Comments of the Press on the Assassination; the Feeling Throughout the Country; Words of Sympathy from All Parts of the World; Voices from the Pulpit, Including Sermons by Henry Ward Beecher, Storrs, Robert S. McArthur, J. P. Newman, and Other Prominent Clergymen. Cincinnati: Cincinnati Publishing Co., 1881.

The Life, Crime and Death of Charles J. Guiteau, the Assassin of James A. Garfield, President of the U. S. New York: Frank Tousey, 1882. Banner: New York, July 1, 1882.

The Life, Great Trial, and Execution of Charles Jules [sic] Guiteau, the Assassin of Our Lamented President James Abram Garfield: A Full Account. Philadelphia: Barcaly & Co., 1882.

Lindop, Edmund. Assassinations That Shook America. New York: Franklin Watts, 1992.

Lippitt, F. J. “Question of Jurisdiction in the Case of Charles J. Guiteau.” International Review 12 (1882): 390.

“List of the Cincinnati Citizens Giving One Cent Each to Pay the Fine of the Old Soldier Capt. C. A. Cook Who Slapped the Mouth of One George Morrison Who Said He Hoped that the Wounded President Would Die.” [Cincinnati, 1881][Newspaper supplement in the Western Reserve Historical Society.]

Lovering. J. F. “The Attempt on the Life of Our President: Its Political Effects. A Paper Read Before the Congregational Club Worcester, Mass. Sept. 19, 1881. By J. F. Lovering, Minister, Old South Church Worcester, Mass.” Worcester: Printed by Lucius P. Goddard, 425 Main Street. 1881.

May, Joseph. Happy in Life and In Death. A Sermon Preached in Reference to the Death of President Garfield, at the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, on Sunday, September 25th, 1881. By Joseph May, Minister of the Church, With the Order of Service and Address on the Public Fast Day, Monday, September 26. Privately Printed. Philadelphia: Edward Stern & Co., 1881.

Madigan, M. J. “Was Guiteau Sane? A Reply to Dr. Elwell’s Rejoinder.” Alienist and Neurologist 5 (April 1884): 227-59 and 5 (July 1884): 386-430.

McBride, James H. “The Mental State of Guiteau: A Review.” Alienist and Neurologist 4 (October 1883): 543-65.

Mann, Edward C. “The Psychological Aspect of the Guiteau Case.” Journal of Psychological Medicine and Mental Pathology 8, no.1 (1882): 28-61.

The Medical News, July 8 and Sept. 9, 1882.

“The Microscopical Appearances of Guiteau’s Brain.” In: Medical Record. New York: W. Wood, 1883. 23, 4 (Jan. 27, 1883): 96‑97.

Mitchell, Stewart. “The Man Who Murdered Garfield.” Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 68 (1941-44): 452-89.

“The Moral Responsibility of the Insane.” North American Review 134 (January 1882): 1-39.

Mulley, A. E. Frew. Charles Julius Guiteau, the Assassin. Being a Copious and Correct Phrenological Delineation of His Character. New York: Gardner & Co.; J. Cohn, 1881.

Nast, Thomas. “From Grave to Gay.” Harper’s Weekly. December 10, 1881.

Nord, Paul David. “Systematic Benevolence: Religious Publishing and the Marketplace in Early Nineteenth-Century America.” Communications & Change in American Religious History. Edited by Leonard I. Sweet. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1993, 239-269.

Norton, Frances Marie [Frances Guiteau Scoville]. The Stalwarts, or Who Were to Blame: A Novel Portraying Fifty Years of American History, Showing These Political Complications which Culminated in Civil War and Even in the Assassination of Two Good Presidents. By the Only Sister of Charles J. Guiteau. Chicago: Frances Marie Norton, 1888.

Noyes, John H. The Berean: A Manual for the Help of Those Who Seek the Faith of the Primitive Church. Putney, Vt.: Published at the Office pf the Spiritual Magazine, 1847.

“Official Report of the Post Mortem Examination of Charles J. Guiteau.” Criminal Case No. 14056. United States Supreme Court for the District of Columbia. Record Group 21. National Archives, Washington, D.C.

Ogilvie, John Stuart. History of the Attempted Assassination of James A. Garfield. Together with a Complete History of Charles J. Guiteau, the Assassin. Cincinnati, O.: Cincinnati Publishing Co., 1881.

________. The Life and Death of James A. Garfield. From the Tow Path to the White House. Together with a Complete Account of His Assassination; History of Charles J. Guiteau, the Assassin. Cincinnati: Cincinnati Publishing Co., s.d.

Old‑time Mountain Ballads. Floyd, VA: County Records, 1995, 1926.

Old‑time Ballads from the Southern Mountains. New York, N.Y.: County, 1971, 1927.

Opper, Frederick B. “How to Become an Idol.” Puck. January 4, 1882.

O’ Sullivan, Dennis. Famous Assassinations of History. [New York]: Frank Tousey, 1882.

Packard, Jerrold M. American Monarchy: A Social Guide to the Presidency. New York: Delacrit Press, 1983, 114, 142.

Paine, Lauran. The Assassin’s World. New York: Taplinger Publishing Co., 1975, 124-127.

Parker, Owen W. “The Assassination and Gunshot Wound of President James A. Garfield.” Minnesota Medicine 34 (March 1951): 227-33.

Peskin, Allan. “Charles Guiteau of Illinois.” Journal of Illinois State Historical Society 70 (May 1977): 130-139.

“Petition for a Stay of the Proceedings in the Case of Guiteau,” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Vol. CVI, No. 20 (May 18,1882): 476-477.

The Phipps Family. New York: Folkways Records and Service Corp., 1965

The Phipps Family: Faith, Love and Tragedy. (Folkways Cassettes Series) Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Folkways Records, 1991.

Pictorial History of President Garfield’s Career: His Home Life, Inauguration and Assassination. New York: Frank Leslie’s Publishing House, [1881.]

Pratt, Corydon. Guiteau and the Public Reflex Action of Life Upon Matter. Life—Its Object and Purpose. Religion and its Tendencies. Pratt’s Hollow, Madison County, New York, 1884.

“Prayers Submitted by the Counsel for the Government, for Instructions to be Given by the Court to the Jury.” [1882.] [Manuscript.]

President Garfield Dead! Complete Pictorial History of the Assassin and His Crime. Police Gazete Extra. [New York:] Richard K. Fox, 1881

Presidential Album. Containing over One Hundred and Fifty Illustrations, Consisting of Portraits of All the Presidents, from Washington to Arthur, Together with Views of Their Private Residences. Also, Forty‑Six Illustrations, Depicting Scenes in the Life, Death and Burial of President Garfield, Together with Many Illustrations of the Continued Trial of Guiteau. [Boston]: Published by Cummings Brothers, 1882.

Reed, Charles H. United States of America vs. Charles J. Guiteau. Brief for Defendant. Washington: Gibson Brothers, Printers, 1882. (At head of title: Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. General Term, April, A.D. 1882).

Report of the Proceedings in the Case of the United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau, Tried in the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Holding a Criminal Term, and Beginning November 14, 1881. Washington, D.C., 1882. 3v.

Rexford, Rev. E. L., D.D. God and Crime. Guiteau’s Criminal Partnership with God and Certain Historical Parallels. [s.l., s.d.]

Riddle, A. G. The Life, Character and Public Services of Jas. A. Garfield. By A. G. Riddle, Author of “Students and Lawyers,” “Bart Ridgley,” “Alice Brand,” Etc., Etc. Cleveland, Ohio: W. W. Williams, Publisher, c. 1881.

Ridpath, John Clark, LL. D. Das Leben und Wirken von James A. Garfield. Eine Schinderung seiner Kinderjahre, seines Jugendstrebens, seiner Entwidelung zu einen charaktersesten Manne, seiner Energie als Soldat, seiner Karriere als Staatsmann und seiner Erwahlung zum Praesidenten; nebst der Beschreibung seines tragischen Todes. Memorial Ausgabe. Cincinnati, Ohio: Jones Brothers, 1881.

________. The Life and Trial of Guiteau the Assassin, Embracing a Sketch of His Early Career; His Dastardly Attack Upon the President; The Conduct of the Murderer in Prison; His Autobiography; The Strange Drama in the Court-Room; The Testimony of Experts and Celebrated Witnesses; The Progress of the Judicial Proceedings; Striking Scenes of the Trial; the Verdict and the Sentence of Death. By John Clark Ridpath, LL. D., Author of Life and Work of Garfield; A Popular History of the United States, etc. Illustrated. Cincinnati: Jones Brothers & Company, 1882.

________. The Life and Work of James A. Garfield, Twentieth President of the United States: Embracing An Account of the Scenes and Incidents of His Boyhood; The Struggles of His Youth; The Might of His Early Manhood; His Valor as a Soldier; His Career as a Statesman; His Election to the Presidency; and The Tragic Story of His Death. Cincinnati, Philadelphia: Jones Brothers & Company, 1881.

________. The Life and Work of James A. Garfield, Twentieth President of the United States: Embracing An Account of the Scenes and Incidents of His Boyhood; The Struggles of His Youth; The Might of His Early Manhood; His Valor as a Soldier; His Career as a Statesman; His Election to the Presidency; and The Tragic Story of His Death. By John Clark Ridpath, LL.D. Author of A Popular History of the United States; A Grammar-School History of History of the United States; An Inductive Grammar of the English Language, etc. Copiously Illustrated. At head of title: Memorial Edition. Cincinnati: Walden & Stowe, 1882, c1881.
Another issue: Hartford, Ct.: J. Betts, 1881.

Ring, Nancy McN. “The Religious Affiliations of Our Presidential Assassins.” Mid-America 16 (October 1933): 89-104; 16 (January 1934): 147-156.

Robinson, G. Wilse. “A Study of Political Assassinations.” American Journal of Psychiatry 121 (May 1965):1060-64.

Roseberry, Cecil R. “The Letters of Garfield’s Assassin.” Manuscript 7 (1955): 86-91.

Rosenberg, Charles E. “The Place of George M. Beard in Nineteenth-Century Psychiatry.” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 36 (1962): 245-59.

________. The Trial of the Assassin Guiteau: Psychiatry and Law in the Gilded Age. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1968.

Schoyen, David Monrad. Praesident Garfield, hans liv og snigmord : samt en interessant beretning om hans maerkelige bane fra hans ungdomsliv paa farmen til hans ende som nationens forste mand : tiligemed en biografisk skizze af hans morder, Charles J. Guiteau. Chicago, Ill.: Verdens gangs forlag, 1881. (Amerikanske fortaellinger; nr. 4)

________. President Garfield. Intressant Skildring Af Hans Lefnad Och Det Å Honon Föröfvade Lönnmordet, Tillika Med En Biografisk Skiss Af Hans Mördare Carles J. Guiteau. Af David Monrad Schoyen. Med Illustrationer. Chicago, Enander & Bohmans Förlag. 1882.

Sicherman, Barbara. The Quest for Mental Health in America, 1880-1917. New York: Columbia University, 1967.

Sims, Ezra. Two Folk Songs. (Composers Facsimile Edition). New York: American Composers Alliance, 1961

Six Lies Nailed: The Assassination of President Lincoln Lie. The Assassination of President Garfield Lie. The Assassination of President McKinley Lie. The Lincoln Prophecy Lie. The Lafayette Prophecy Lie. The Pope Pius IX and the Confederacy Lie. Brooklyn: International Catholic Truth Society, 1914.

Smith, William R. Assassination and Insanity: Guiteau’s Case. Examined and Compared with Analogous Cases from the Earlier to the Present Times. Washington, D.C.: William R. Smith, 1881.

Sondheim, Stephen. Assassins. Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. [Vocal score]. Rilting Music ; Secaucus, N.J. : Warner Bros.Publications [distributor], c1992.

________. Assassins. Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim; Book by John Weidman. [Sound disc]. RCA Victor, 1991.

_________. Assassins. Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim; Book by John Weidman.[Libretto]. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 1991.

Southern Mountain Folksongs and Ballads. (Riverside Folklore Series). New York: Riverside Records, 1952, 1959.

Sowers, Zachariah Turner. Official Report of the Post-Mortem Examination of Charles J. Guiteau, June 30, 1882. [Washington, D.C.: s. n.,] 1882.

Spitzka, Edward C. “The Case of Guiteau.” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal 106 (March 23, 1882): 285-86.

________. “A Contribution to the Medical Status of Guiteau and the History of His Trial.” Alienist and Neurologist 4 (April 1883): 201-220.

________. “Editorial Notes and Comments: The Guiteau Autopsy.” American Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry 1 (August 1882): 381-92; 1 (November 1882): 522-40.

________. The Guiteau Autopsy. New York, 1882. Reprint of “Editorial Notes and Comments: The Guiteau Autopsy.” American Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry 1 (August 1882): 381-92 and 1 (November 1882): 522-40.

________. Insanity: Its Classification, Diagnosis, and Treatment. A Manual for Students and Practitioners of Medicine. New York: Birmingham & Co., 1883.

________. “Merits and Motives of the Movement for Asylum Reform,” Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases 5 (1878): 694-714.

________. “Reform in the Scientific Study of Psychiatry,” Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases 5 (1878): 201-228.

________. “A Reply to J. J. Elwell, M.D., in re Guiteau.” Alienist and Neurologist 4 (July 1883): 417-38.

Stein, Diana. Diana and Joe Stein collection, 1859-1931. Scrapbook of Clippings from the Sun (Baltimore, Maryland)...Concerning the Assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth and the Conspiracy Trials, and the Trial of Charles Guiteau for the Assassination of President James A. Garfield, 1859‑1881.

Stearns, Henry Putnam. Expert Testimony in the Case of the United States v. Guiteau. Hartford, Conn.: Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 1882. (Reprinted from Archives of Medicine 7 (June 1882):286-307.

Sunderland, Byron. A Discourse by Rev. Dr. Byron Sunderland, On the Shooting of President Garfield at the Depot in Washington, Saturday Morning, July 2d, 1881, By Charles J. Guiteau: Delivered at The First Presbyterian Church, Washington, D.C. Sabbath Morning, July 3d, 1881. Washington, D.C.: R. O. Polkinhorn, Printer. 1881.

Taylor, J. M. “Assassin on Trial.” American Heritage, 32(4) 1981.

Taylor, Richard S. “Gilded Age Evangelicals, New Evangelical Historians, and the Politics of Discourse.” Hayes Historical Journal 9 (Winter 1990): 14-29.

Thayer, William M. From Log-Cabin to the White House: Life of James A. Garfield: Boyhood, Youth, Manhood, Assassination, Death, Funeral. By William M. Thayer, Author of “The Pioneer Boy, and How He Became President,” “Tact, Push, and Principle,” Lives of “Amos Lawrence,” “Charles Jewett,” etc. Boston: James H. Earle, Publisher; Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry, 1881, c1880.

Torrey, E. Fuller, M.D., “The Year Neurology Almost Took Over Psychiatry.” Psychiatric Times Vol. XIX, 1 (January 2002), http:/www.mhsource.com/pt/p0202101b.html

“Trial of Charles J. Guiteau.” Saturday Review of Politics, Literature, Science and Art 53 (1882): 101.

Trumble, Alfred. The Assassin's Doom. Full Account of the Jail Life, Trial and Sentence of Chas. J. Guiteau. A Sequel to "Guiteau's Crime." New York: R. K. Fox, 1882. (Police Gazette Series of Famous Criminals, no. 3).

Trumble, Alfred. Guiteau's Crime. The Full History of the Murder of President James A. Garfield. With Complete Secret Biography of the Assassin. New York: R. K. Fox, 1881. (Police Gazette Series of Famous Criminals).

Tucher, Andie. Froth & Scum. Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the Ax Murder in America’s First Mass Medium. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

[United States. Indiana. Bloomington. “Folksong Revival Concert,” 1963] [Sound recording.]

U.S. Supreme Court. Report of the Proceedings in the Case of the United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau, Tried in the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Holding a Criminal Term, and Beginning November 14, 1881. H. H. Alexander and Edward D. Easton, official stenographers. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1882. 3 v.

U. S. Supreme Court. In the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, Holding a Criminal Term of June Term, AD 1881. The U. S. versus Charles J. Guiteau no. 14,056. Bill of Exception. [1881]. Reprint of the document submitted to the President by John W. Guiteau in the Matter of Application for a Commission De Lunatico Inquirendo, June 23, 1882. File No. 14056, National Archives.

U.S. Supreme Court. The United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau. New York: Arno Press, 1973.Reprint..

United States vs. Charles J. Guiteau, Criminal Case 14056. United States Supreme Court for the District of Columbia, Record Group 21, National Archives, Washington, D.C.

Wales, John Albert. “Approaching the End: The Doctors Have Agreed, Now Let the Jury Agree.” The Judge December 24 1881.

Wales, John Albert. “A Model Office-Seeker.” Puck July 13, 1881.

Wales, John Albert. “Universal Chorus: ‘Remove’ the Clown and Close the Farce as Soon as Possible.” The Judge December 3, 1881.

Walters, Ronald. American Reformers: 1815-1860. New York: Hill and Wang, 1978.

“Washington, D.C.—The Attack on the President’s Life.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper July 16, 1881.

“Washington, D.C.—The Closing Act in the Tragedy of President Garfield's Assassination.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper July 8, 1882.

“Washington, D.C.: The Doomed Assassin, Guiteau, Under the Shadow of the Death‑Watch.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper Vol. LIV, no. 1, 397 (July 1, 1882), 289.

Weinstein, Allen and R. Jackson Wilson. Freedom and Crisis: An American History. New York: Random House Inc., 1974, Chapter 27.

Wetzell, Richard F. Inventing the Criminal. A History of German Criminology, 1880-1945. Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Williams, Walter W. “Sermon Preached in Christ Church by Rev. Walter W. Williams, D. D. Rector, September 25th, 1881.” Baltimore: The Sun Job Printing Office, 1881.

Worcester, Samuel. Insanity and its Treatment. Lectures on the Treatment of Insanity and Kindred Nervous Diseases. 1882.

________. “Review of the Guiteau Case,” New England Medical Gazette. Vol.17, no. 4 (April 1882): 114-122; Vol. 17, no. 5 (May 1882): 148‑158.

________. Review of the Guiteau Case. [Salem, Mass.: s.n.,] 1882. Reprinted from New England Medical Gazette. Boston Vol.17, no. 4 (April 1882): 114-122; Vol. 17, no. 5 (May 1882): 148‑158.

Wortman, Denis. An Address Commemorative of James A. Garfield, President of the United States. By Rev. Denis Wortman, D. D. Pastor of the Reformed Church, Fort Plain, N. Y. Sabbath Evening, Sept. 25, 1881. Fort Plain, N.Y.: Horace L. Greene, Book and Job Printer, 1881. At Head of title: Strangulatus Pro Republica.

Wright, J. A. Was President Garfield Providentially Removed by the Assassin Guiteau? –Or—Do Liberal Fear to Die? Concluded with References on Civilization. A discussion on the above Subjects Was Held in the Youngstown Ohio Free Press. By J. A. Wright And a Prominent Clergyman, Who Says He Is Forced to Conceal his Identity. Indianapolis, Ind.: The Ironclad Age Print, [1882]

Journals and Periodicals Consulted

The Alienist and Neurologist. 1881-1884

American Journal of Insanity. 1881-1884.

American Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry. 1882.

American Journal of Psychiatry, XIII(1), July, 1933.

American Law Review. 1881-1884.

Boston Medical and Surgical Journal. 1881-1884.

The Congregationalist. 1881-1882.

Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease vol. 9, no. 1 (January, 1882): 90-125.

New York Herald. 1881-1882.

New York Times. 1881-1882.

North American Review. 1881-1884.




History, romance and philosophy of great American crimes and criminals ...

 By Frank Triplett

In the year 1875, late in the autumn, Guiteau, who was, as he expressed it, "all run down and run out," determined to return to Chicago, purchase the "Inter-Ocean," and turn his grand talents to newspaper editorship. He prepared a series of editorials for the paper, as he intended running it, and on the strength of these, approached Mr. Farwell and other Chicago capitalists to solicit them for a $200,000 subscription looking to the purchase of the paper for him. He told Mr. Farwell that with this paper he couhl easily make him President of the United States. Of course no one subscribed a cent toward the silly egotist's scheme, and onco more he turned his attention to the legal profession.

He probably found the iaw a hard mistress, and its practice, in his peculiar manner, rather unprofitabe, for in the fall of 1876, we find him veering toward theology, and endeavoring to assist Moody and Sankey in their exciting revivals. So officious and obtrusive did he become, and so thoroughly did his self-seeking and shallowness show through all of his actions, that he was commanded to subside. Of all this he says nothing, but in telling the tale merely states that about this time he "began to get some conceptions about the second coming of Christ." From his meditations on this subject he wrote out his book, which he called "The Truth," in which he places the Second Advent at the destruction of Jerusalem, in the year 70 of our era.

Out of this farrago of nonsense he evolved a lecture entitled the "Second Coming of Christ at the Destruction of Jerusalem, A. D. 70." This lecture was first delivered in Chicago, in one of the Methodist churches, in the month of January, 1877. The admission was fixed at "Twenty-five cents, free to all who cannot afford to pay twenty-five cents." An audience of about twenty-five people assembled to hear the lecture, and the next day's Tribune critisized it and the lecturer unmercifully. From Chicago he made a considerable lecturing tour throughout the West, making signal failures everywhere, and in 1880 we find him again in New York.

He had tried law, politics, religion; tried to try journalism and was about to give politics another trial. He says that from the 1st of July, 1880, until the 5th of March, 1881, he was around the headquarters of the Republican National Committee, at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. On the 6th of August, 1881, he retouched and amended one of his Greeley speeches and had it printed as a Republican campaign document. Hecalledit "Garfield against Hancock," and he sent a copy of it to every prominent Republican. As he met them afterward, he would introduce himself, and call their attention to this speech. In this way he made the acquaintance of Arthur, Logan, Conkling, Cameron and others.

This speech he delivered but a single time during the campaign, at a colored meeting. Even then he delivered but a portion of it, and then handed the speech to the reporters to print. When it was ascertained that Garfield was elected, Guiteau wrote him as follows:

"We have cleared them all out, just as I expected. Thank God!

Very respectfully,

Charles Guiteau." He now concluded to claim the reward due his great services, and after some meditation, determined to apply for the Austrian Mission. So intense was his egotism that he never for a moment doubted that he would get it. He wrote letters to Garfield and Blaine calling their attention to his services during the campaign, and boldly asking for the Austrian Mission. He says he heard nothing about the Austrian Mission until he noticed in a paper that it had been given to Blaine's particular friend, William Walter Phelps. He then turned his attention to the Paris Consulship, and in soliciting for this place he proved a terrible bore to both Garfield and Blaine. He forced himself one time into Garfield's room and handed hima copy of the ever-present speech, "Garfield against Hancock,"

What do YOU think ?

Submit Your Comments For Posting Here
Comment Box Disabled For Security


Date: 09 Sep 2006
Time: 19:56:20

Comments:

Man what a sweet article/archive ! Thanks
Prophet W

Click For Index Page

Free Online Books Historical Preterism Modern Preterism Study Archive Critical Articles Dispensationalist dEmEnTiA  Main Josephus Church History Hyper Preterism Main

Email PreteristArchive.com's Sole Developer and Curator, Todd Dennis  (todd @ preteristarchive.com) Opened in 1996
http://www.preteristarchive.com