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Not One Stone Left Upon Another : The catastrophic fall of Jerusalem in A.D. 70 forever changed the face of Judaism—and the fate of Christians

"Jesus predicted it 37 years before it happened. Herod Agrippa II and his sister Bernice, who heard Paul's testimony at Caesarea (Acts 26), tried hard to prevent it, as did the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus (our main source of first-century information). But the fall of Jerusalem and the burning of the Temple in A.D. 70 happened nevertheless, and it was a catastrophe with almost unparalleled consequences for Jews, Christians, and, indeed, all of subsequent history."


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1-1000

EARLY CHURCH

Ambrose
Ambrose, Pseudo
Andreas
Arethas
Aphrahat
Athanasius
Augustine
Barnabus
BarSerapion
Baruch, Pseudo
Bede
Chrysostom
Chrysostom, Pseudo
Clement, Alexandria
Clement, Rome
Clement, Pseudo
Cyprian
Ephraem
Epiphanes
Eusebius
Gregory
Hegesippus
Hippolytus
Ignatius
Irenaeus
Isidore
James
Jerome
King Jesus
Apostle John
Lactantius
Luke
Mark
Justin Martyr
Mathetes
Matthew
Melito
Oecumenius
Origen
Apostle Paul
Apostle Peter
Maurus Rabanus
Remigius
"Solomon"
Severus
St. Symeon
Tertullian
Theophylact
Victorinus

Early Christian History

"For in the last days false prophets and corrupters shall be multiplied, and the sheep shall be turned into wolves, and love shall be turned into hate; for when lawlessness increases, they shall hate and persecute and betray one another, and then shall appear the world-deceiver as Son of God, and shall do signs and wonders, and the earth shall be delivered into his hands, and he shall do iniquitous things which have never yet come to pass since the beginning. Then shall the creation of men come into the fire of trial, and many shall be made to stumble and shall perish; but those who endure in their faith shall be saved from under the curse itself. And then shall appear the signs of the truth: first, the sign of an outspreading in heaven, then the sign of the sound of the trumpet. And third, the resurrection of the dead -- yet not of all, but as it is said: "The Lord shall come and all His saints with Him." Then shall the world see the Lord coming upon the clouds of heaven." - Didache 16 (source)

 

WHAT OTHERS HAVE SAID

 

Gary DeMar
"The definitive work on the Didache was written by the French Canadian J.P. Audet who concluded "that it was composed, almost certainly in Antioch, between 50 and 70." Aaron Milavec's 1000-page study of the Didache also places its composition sometime between AD 50 and 70. This means, of course, the citations from the Olivet Discourse fit well for a preterist interpretation." (
Also "The Early Church and the End of the World", pp. 28-32)

 

Philip Schaff: "The Didache aptly closes with an exhortation to watchfulness and readiness for the coming of the Lord, as the goal of the Christian's hope. The sixteenth chapter is an echo of the eschatological discourses in the Synoptical Gospels, especially the twenty-fourth chapter of Matthew, with the exception of those features which especially refer to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple."

"The Synoptical Gospels were written before AD70, and hence contain no hint at the fulfilment, which could hardly have been avoided had they been written later."

 

 

J.P. Audet
"it was composed, almost certainly in Antioch, between 50 and 70." (Quoted by John A. T. Robinson, Redating the New Testament (Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1976), 323.)

Michael W. Holmes (1992)
"A remarkably wide range of dates, extending from before A.D. 50 to the third century or later, has been proposed for this document. . . . The Didache may have been put into its present form as late as 150, though a date considerably closer to the end of the first century seems more plausible. The materials from which it was composed, however, reflect the state of the church at an even earlier time. The relative simplicity of the prayers, the continuing concern to differentiate Christian practice from Jewish rituals (8.1), and in particular the form of church structure--note the twofold structure of bishops and deacons (cf. Phil. 1:1) and the continued existence of traveling apostles and prophets alongside a resident ministry--reflect a time closer to that of Paul and James (who died in the 60s) than Ignatius (who died sometime after 110)." (The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations, rev. ed. (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, [1992] 1999), 247–248.)

"In his very thorough commentary J.-P. Audet suggests about A.D. 70, and he is not likely to be off by more than a decade in either direction." Michael W. Holmes, ed., The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations of Their Writings, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1992), 247. Holmes references J.-P. Audet, La DidachP: Instructions des Apôtres (Paris: Gabalda, 1958), 187–206.

Stephen J. Patterson (1993)
"at least by the end of the first century or the beginning of the second, and in the case of Jean-P. Audet, as early as 50–70 C.E." (The Gospel of Thomas and Jesus: Thomas Christianity, Social Radicalism, and the Quest of the Historical Jesus (Santa Rosa, CA: Polebridge Press, 1993), 173.)

 

 

What do YOU think ?

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Date: 24 Feb 2009
Time: 14:45:16

Your Comments:

in every case you will find people defending their position on certain biblical belief. I would hope that scholarly work will always speak the truth of the findings and not make the finding fit their beliefs. I am hoping preterist scholars did that.

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