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Church-State Relations and the Book of Revelation
An Introduction to The Parousia: A Careful Look at the New Testament Doctrine of the Lord's Second Coming
by James Stuart Russell (1878) // Written by
Todd Dennis, Curator
 



 

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Not to be confused with Modern Preterist Samuel Lee of Cambridge, England


 

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 1-1000

070: Clement: First Epistle of Clement

075: Baruch: Apocalypse Of Baruch

075: Barnabus: Epistle of Barnabus

090: Esdras 2 / 4 Ezra

100: Odes of Solomon

150: Justin: Dialogue with Trypho

150: Melito: Homily of the Pascha

175: Irenaeus: Against Heresies

175: Clement of Alexandria: Stromata

198: Tertullian: Answer to the Jews

230: Origen: The Principles | Commentary on Matthew | Commentary on John | Against Celsus

248: Cyprian: Against the Jews

260: Victorinus: Commentary on the Apocalypse "Alcasar, a Spanish Jesuit, taking a hint from Victorinus, seems to have been the first (AD 1614) to have suggested that the Apocalyptic prophecies did not extend further than to the overthrow of Paganism by Constantine."

310: Peter of Alexandria

310: Eusebius: Divine Manifestation of our Lord

312: Eusebius: Proof of the Gospel

319: Athanasius: On the Incarnation

320: Eusebius: History of the Martyrs

325: Eusebius: Ecclesiastical History

345: Aphrahat: Demonstrations

367: Athanasius: The Festal Letters

370: Hegesippus: The Ruin of Jerusalem

386: Chrysostom: Matthew and Mark

387: Chrysostom: Against the Jews

408: Jerome: Commentary on Daniel

417: Augustine: On Pelagius

426: Augustine: The City of God

428: Augustine: Harmony

420: Cassian: Conferences

600: Veronica Legend

800: Aquinas: Eternity of the World

 


1000-2006

FUTURIST
HISTORICAL
MODERN

1265: Aquinas: Catena Aurea

1543: Luther: On the Jews

1555: Calvin: Harmony on Evangelists

1556: Jewel: Scripture

1586: Douay-Rheims Bible

1598: Jerusalem's Misery ; The dolefull destruction of faire Ierusalem by Tytus, the Sonne of Vaspasian

1603: Nero : A New Tragedy

1613: Carey: The Fair Queen of Jewry

1614: Alcasar: Vestigatio arcani sensus in Apocalypsi

1654: Ussher: The Annals of the World

1658: Lightfoot: Commentary from Hebraica

1677: Crowne - The Destruction of Jerusalem

1764: Lardner: Fulfilment of our Saviour's Predictions

1776: Edwards: History of Redemption

1785: Churton: Prophecies Respecting the Destruction of Jerusalem

1801: Porteus: Our Lord's Prophecies

1802: Nisbett: The Coming of the Messiah

1805: Jortin: Remarks on Ecclesiastical History

1810: Clarke: Commentary On the Whole Bible

1816: Wilkins: Destruction of Jerusalem Related to Prophecies

1824: Galt: The Bachelor's Wife

1840: Smith: The Destruction of Jerusalem

1841: Currier: The Second Coming of Christ

1842: Bastow : A (Preterist) Bible Dictionary

1842: Stuart: Interpretation of Prophecy

1843: Lee: Dissertations on Eusebius

1845: Stuart: Commentary on Apocalypse

1849: Lee: Inquiry into Prophecy

1851: Lee: Visions of Daniel and St. John

1853: Newcombe: Observations on our Lord's Conduct as Divine Instructor

1854: Chamberlain: Restoration of Israel

1854: Fairbairn: The Typology of Scripture

1859: "Lee of Boston": Eschatology

1861: Maurice: Lectures on the Apocalypse

1863: Thomas Lewin : The Siege of Jerusalem

1865: Desprez: Daniel (Renounced Full Preterism)

1870: Fall of Jerusalem and the Roman Conquest

1871: Dale: Jewish Temple and Christian Church (PDF)

1879: Warren: The Parousia

1882: Farrar: The Early Days of Christianity

1883: Milton S. Terry: Biblical Hermeneutics

1888: Henty: For The Temple

1891: Farrar: Scenes in the days of Nero

1896: Lee : A Scholar of a Past Generation

1902: Church: Story of the Last Days of Jerusalem

1917: Morris: Christ's Second Coming Fulfilled

1985: Lee: Jerusalem; Rome; Revelation (PDF)

1987: Chilton: The Days of Vengeance

2001: Fowler: Jesus - The Better Everything

2006: M. Gwyn Morgan - AD69 - The Year of Four Emperors

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Eschatology

Or, The Scripture Doctrine of the Coming of the Lord, the Judgment,
and the Resurrection

Samuel Lee of Boston
(1859)

CLICK HERE FOR PDF FILE OF ENTIRE BOOK
(5.7MB PDF)

"The Coming of the Son of Man" is to be interpreted with the same latitude, and applies to the work of the Messiah from the time of his resurrection to the overthrow of the Jewish power.  Not till then -- when the seventh angel had sounded -- were there great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord and of his Christ.   Then the transition period closed.. As instances of the use of the language in application to Christ down to the time of the destruction of Jerusalem and the complete introduction of the Christian Dispensation, see Matt. 24:30, 37-39. Mark 13:24-26. Luke 21:25-27." (p. 13)

"If we refer to the Mosaic institute we shall find that its motives are drawn, not from the future, but from the present world. The rewards of fidelity and the penalties for disobedience were of time and earth...In the Pentateuch we find no motives drawn from the future world. The Old Testament makes no allusion to the mode of existence that succeeds the present." Again he says, "It must be remembered that the rewards and punishments of the Mosaic institutes were exclusively temporal. No allusion is found, in the case of individuals or communities, in which reference is made to the good or evil of a future state as a motive to obedience." (Eschatology; or, the Scriptural Doctrine of the Coming of the Lord, the Judgment, and the Resurrection. By Samuel Lee, Boston, 1859, pp. 6, 144-150.)

"The phrase The Coming of the Lord, as used by the Apostles, refers to a period in the history of Christians, and of each Christian in particular, when A CLUSTER OF MOMENTOUS FACTS shall simultaneously occur. The faith and earthly estimates of the Christians of our day fix upon death, considered as the termination of the animal life, and of the present social and earthly relations, as the great fact. The clear-visioned faith and spirituality of the Apostles and inspired writers saw chiefly, and almost only, in this cluster, the Parousia the fact that then there would come over them such a change in the mode of their being, as to render them like the glorified Jesus, like saints, like angels: so that henceforth Jesus and saints and angels would be to them present in the same sense that men in this life are, when together, present to each other. To them, the death of the body was only as the throwing down of the scaffolding, that the building might appear, and he in fact ready for occupancy.  We have further come to the conclusion, that the Judgment is contemporaneous with the Coming of the Lord that the word Judgment, as used in the Scriptures, is nearly equivalent to the modern word government in all its functions: and that judgment was given to the Messiah when the government was placed upon his shoulders. So that he has judged men given them not only law but award, ever since he was constituted the Son of God in power, or, in his own words (Mat. xvi, 2l) rewarded every man according to his works." (Eschatology, pp. 267)

 

WHAT OTHERS HAVE SAID

New Englander and Yale review (1859)
LEES Eschatology - Messrs. J. E. Tilton & Co. have recently issued a volume on eschatology, of more than ordinary interest and importance. It is the result of much research and independent thinking, and deserves the consideration of all students of the Scriptures. The author has been embarrassed by the difficulties that attend the received interpretations of the New Testament in respect to the coming of Christ, the last judgment, and the Resurrection; and has sought for years to find those that are better. The conclusions at which he arrives are presented in the following summary:

 If the preceding exegesis be correct, then it is true that The Coming of the Son of Man is not to be confounded with The Coming of the Lord. The former refers to his coming as a man to introduce and take upon himself the administration of the kingdom of God the Christian Dispensation. When that work was entirely accomplished, he was no longer the Son of Man. Henceforth he was the Son of God in power. 

The phrase The Coming of the Lord, as used by the Apostles, refers to a period in the history of Christians, and of each Christian in particular, when A CLUSTER OF MOMENTOUS FACTS shall simultaneously occur. The faith and earthly estimates of the Christians of our day fix upon death, considered as the termination of the animal life, and of the present social and earthly relations, as the great fact. The clear-visioned faith and spirituality of the Apostles and inspired writers saw chiefly, and almost only, in this cluster, the Parousia the fact that then there would come over them such a change in the mode of their being, as to render them like the glorified Jesus, like saints, like angels: so that henceforth Jesus and saints and angels would be to them present in the same sense that men in this life are, when together, present to each other. To them, the death of the body was only as the throwing down of the scaffolding, that the building might appear, and he in fact ready for occupancy.  We have further come to the conclusion, that the Judgment is contemporaneous with the Coming of the Lord that the word Judgment, as used in the Scriptures, is nearly equivalent to the modern word government in all its functions: and that judgment was given to the Messiah when the government was placed upon his shoulders. So that he has judged men given them not only law but award, ever since he was constituted the Son of God in power, or, in his own words (Mat. xvi, 2l) rewarded every man according to his works.  * Eschatology; or, the Scripture Doctrine of the Coming of the Lord; The Judnment, and the Resurrection. By SAMUEL LEE. Boston: J. E. Tilton & Co. 1859. l2mo. pp. 267.

 And we have found that the Resurrection the development and commencing exercise of the spiritual body, is one of these facts. The change by which the mortal gives place to immortality, is in a moment.  And finally, the Anastasis, by which is meant a Future Life, dates in all its completeness from this epoch.  We have found in the Bible no Intermediate State that state which is neither probationary, punitive, nor remunerative, and has therefore no place in the moral administration of God.  We have not found the Bible teaching an End of the World. An end of the present aion (dispensation) it does indeed teach; but no end of the cosmos (world.) pp. 250, 251, 252.

 The argument in support of these positions is presented under the following heads: The Coming of the Son of Man; The Coming of the Lord; The Judgment; The Resurrection; Prophecy Restored. In treating of these topics, the texts appropriate to each are distinctly considered and thoroughly discussed. We cannot enter into an extended criticism of the interpretations given by the author. This would involve a critical review, instead of notice, of the volume. The distinction made between the coming of the Son of Man, and the coming of the Lord, is new to us; and if it can be sustained, involves important inferences. We are struck with the ingenuity and force of the exposition given of the passages which relate to the destruction of Jerusalem and the winding up of the Jewish dispensation. We are not, however, convinced that the declarations of the writers of the New Testament can in any way be reconciled with the rejection of the received opinions concerning the day of judgment and the resurrection of the body. We trust the volume will receive the attention which it deserves, and that it will open the way for the more thorough discussion of the subjects of which it treats. The earnest student will find the volume very instructive and full of the seeds of thought. [Volume 17, Issue 67, August 1859]

 

New Ipswitch
Not less beloved than Parson Farrar as a faithful pastor and loyal friend was the Rev. Samuel Lee, who was a Yale graduate and a writer of theological books. Mr. Lee, who was a native of Connecticut, was left fatherless in infancy. As his mother was in poor circumstances she decided to apprentice the boy, when he should be old enough, to learn the shoemaker's trade; but a very different fate was awaiting him. When quite a young boy he was stricken with some hip disease and his life was despaired of for some time. One day an aged clergyman came to see the boy. During this visit the old many knelt down by the bedside and prayed fervently that the sick child might recover and become a minister of the gospel. These words were the first inspiration to that calling which Samuel Lee followed in after years. Though lamed for life, he recovered, and the minister's prayer was granted. Samuel Lee became a pupil of "Peter Parley" and was in his youth a school teacher, receiving seven dollars a month for salary, and going about on crutches from one farmhouse to another to "board out" the rest of his  stipend. He left two well-know theological works, his "Eschatology," which is a text-book in the New Haven Divinity School, and "The Bible Regained," dedicated to his "beloved and only daughter, Sarah Fiske Lee," herself a genealogist of considerable note. Miss Lee has inherited much of her father's taste for antiquarian research and curio collecting. At the old parsonage or Lee house, the writer was shown a volume which would have set the heart of a bibliomaniac thumping with desire. This precious tome is a huge Bible, the ancient and yellowed title-page of which bears this legend:
 

"Enpriented at London in Flete
Strete--At the Signe of the Sunne
by Edwarde G. Hitchwiche the
Last Daie of Ianuarie
Anno Domine
1548."
   From the date this must have been one of the Bibles which by the royal decree of Edward the  Sixth was ordered to be chained to the reading desks in the churches in England. Unfortunately, a previous owner had had new covers made for the antique volume, so the traces of the chain by which it had been bound were not visible.

 

 

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